Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

103,173 notes

withfiendfyre:

These posters are in the stalls of the bathrooms at my university (at least in the ladies, I haven’t asked anyone if they’re in the gents too. I hope so though). Thank you National Union of Students for doing it right. If only they put these posters up in all public bathrooms

If you have the option, consider a similar campaign in your school or work environment. I know I’ve personally had challenges in this area because I’m gender nonconforming and have been mistaken for a male in the women’s restroom many times…but haven’t felt safe enough to pass in the men’s on days when it would be appropriate. For many of us, without people being told outright that they are safe and that we need to be given that same right, public bathrooms can range from a source of anxiety to an outright dangerous situation.

(via milestaylorcosplay)

Filed under education lgbtq doing it right

17 notes

Using Printmaking to Connect Art and Math, a project from Ms. Drummond

artededucator:

Hello all! My school added a third full-time art teacher this year, but did not increase our budget. Money will be tight so I’m trying to get supplies funded through donor’s choose! I want my students to be able to experience printmaking, but the supplies we have are in very bad shape (10+ years old, broken…) I do a unit with 6th grade where I connect art with geometry/shapes/types of symmetry/angles of rotation, so you would be supporting arts education, STEAM (and STEM) education, interdisciplinary learning, and project based learning.

This project is already half off thanks to the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, and until Friday the 29th, if you type in the code INSPIRE, your donation gets matched! I could have this funded with only a few small donations!

Please donate if you can, or if not, I’d appreciate some reblogs too!

Interdisciplinary learning is one of my favorite things in education, and this looks like a really incredible setup not only for that but to teach an artistic skill that many don’t get to experience! I’ll be putting my money where my mouth is this evening, and in the meantime, boosting!

(via msleahqueenhbic)

3 notes

On deck for the day:

  • reviewing more organizational principles and guidelines
  • reviewing more age-appropriate activities and developmental milestones
  • browsing Coursera for some refresher courses on development in very young children (birth-K)
  • walking down to a movie 

1,102 notes

dduane:

(via Beloved Illustrator Mary Engelbreit Blasted Over Ferguson Artwork)

Before anyone considers this empty incitement of anti-law enforcement sentiment, consider this:1) Many people of color, because of the racism evidenced not just in the law enforcement system but in society as a whole that leads to so many presumptions that a person of color is more likely to be doing something unlawful to begin with, have to raise their children with lessons of how to interact with the police.  Many children of color learn not that the police are our friends, but how to be careful when interacting with them such that these children will be safe.2) That, and this image, is not making a statement specifically about police.  It is making a statement about a system and society that sets up these scenarios — that teaches people that people of color are more likely to be criminals or aggressive or violent, that justifies acting on those presumptions, that leads to the long list of men and boys of color who were killed by police because they were assumed, perceived, or stated to be a threat, when the same actions against a white victim would draw a completely different set of consequences against the shooter(s).When I’m supposed to teach children that police help keep us safe, if those kids at whatever age have had negative experiences with the police for whatever reason, it makes it difficult for them to believe me.  This has happened with kids of any color — in situations where siblings or parents or friends have been taken by the police for alcohol or drugs or abuse or theft.  But here’s the thing: people of color are disproportionately affected by negative interactions with police, are profiled routinely, are presumed by many in the general public to just be more likely to commit crime.  When that assumption exists and authorities act on these assumptions, when people of color know that this negative perception exists outside of their own words and actions, only real trust-building through real action can begin to restore enough faith in the system that this is not something anyone has to teach their children.

dduane:

(via Beloved Illustrator Mary Engelbreit Blasted Over Ferguson Artwork)

Before anyone considers this empty incitement of anti-law enforcement sentiment, consider this:

1) Many people of color, because of the racism evidenced not just in the law enforcement system but in society as a whole that leads to so many presumptions that a person of color is more likely to be doing something unlawful to begin with, have to raise their children with lessons of how to interact with the police. Many children of color learn not that the police are our friends, but how to be careful when interacting with them such that these children will be safe.

2) That, and this image, is not making a statement specifically about police. It is making a statement about a system and society that sets up these scenarios — that teaches people that people of color are more likely to be criminals or aggressive or violent, that justifies acting on those presumptions, that leads to the long list of men and boys of color who were killed by police because they were assumed, perceived, or stated to be a threat, when the same actions against a white victim would draw a completely different set of consequences against the shooter(s).



When I’m supposed to teach children that police help keep us safe, if those kids at whatever age have had negative experiences with the police for whatever reason, it makes it difficult for them to believe me. This has happened with kids of any color — in situations where siblings or parents or friends have been taken by the police for alcohol or drugs or abuse or theft. But here’s the thing: people of color are disproportionately affected by negative interactions with police, are profiled routinely, are presumed by many in the general public to just be more likely to commit crime. When that assumption exists and authorities act on these assumptions, when people of color know that this negative perception exists outside of their own words and actions, only real trust-building through real action can begin to restore enough faith in the system that this is not something anyone has to teach their children.

Filed under Ferguson education racism

53,817 notes

aroavenger:

meaninglessladders:

aroavenger:

i’m crying oh gosh

TUMBLR PROF ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are trans or nonbinary and you are in the same situation as the student above, email your professors before class starts. I understand that it might be uncomfortable, but generally professors are absolutely happy to accommodate you. I know I always will be!
If your professor does not respond positively, contact the Dean or the campus LGBT+ resource center with a copy of the email and show them that you are concerned about gender discrimination in the classroom. 

Also this is a link to the template I used to write this email, and I’ve seen another similar template going around, and this was extremely helpful.

Important and useful advice (and positive example) for all my trans*, nonbinary, or otherwise non-cis followers.

aroavenger:

meaninglessladders:

aroavenger:

i’m crying oh gosh

TUMBLR PROF ANNOUNCEMENT: If you are trans or nonbinary and you are in the same situation as the student above, email your professors before class starts. I understand that it might be uncomfortable, but generally professors are absolutely happy to accommodate you. I know I always will be!

If your professor does not respond positively, contact the Dean or the campus LGBT+ resource center with a copy of the email and show them that you are concerned about gender discrimination in the classroom. 

Also this is a link to the template I used to write this email, and I’ve seen another similar template going around, and this was extremely helpful.

Important and useful advice (and positive example) for all my trans*, nonbinary, or otherwise non-cis followers.

(via nouveauqueer)

26 notes

girlwithalessonplan:

Have you considered the movie “Shelter” for your G/S Alliance?

No, but I just looked it up on Amazon.  The plot seems interesting, but according to Amazon, it’s R (and not available?)  I have to be careful with R-rated movies in school.  We typically do movie “nights” in my room after school.  So far we’ve done “Perks of Being a Wallflower” and “RENT.”

A friend and I are trying to think of LGBTQ+ movies that would be appropriate, and all the ones we keep coming up with follow that terrible ending formula of “one character realizes they’re straight and the other comes out of it with an experience that makes them a better human being and somehow more part of the LGBTQ+ community by merit of having pursued a doomed relationship or something.”

Then I said “well we don’t get happy endings,” and she said, “No, you get Maurice.”

And then through this conversation about tropes in queer-oriented movies and how frequently they end in one-sided or tragic romance or a queer person snapping and killing people, I remembered — I had the perfect recommendation…but it was R-rated.  (The Celluloid Closet.)

HOWEVER.  I highly recommend looking at that documentary for future reference — and to pick out pieces that would be appropriate for your kids, because it’s an incredibly eye-opening film about the history of coding and the treatment of queer characters in Hollywood and television, and it was a big hit with our student group in college. 

And if the general public wants to be informed about history and also possibly depressed, but want to come away with an understanding and appreciation of where we’ve been and where we are to help think critically about where we’re headed, PBS has a top ten list of documentaries about LGBTQ+ issues that they released for Pride and, having seen several of these films, I’m inclined to suspect it’s a good list overall.  There’s a good focus on intersectionality — it isn’t your average “here are a handful of films all about the same hot topic and focusing mainly on white cis gay men with money.”

Filed under she recommended Bend it Like Beckham But that's subtext lgbtq education

13,835 notes

socialworkmemes:

Name an intervention for this guy. Go!

Redirect to an activity that produces a calming, uplifting, or empowering effect that can help break the cycle of stressful thinking and give them the chance to step back to a place where they can reframe.I use this with kids when they’re stuck in cycles of negative thinking.  Instead of trying to work it out while in the middle of an anxious response, we completely redirect to another activity — coloring, throwing a ball, running in circles, doing jumping jacks, doing mazes, talking about something they feel like an expert at.  Then when they feel ready we look at the stressor and try to reframe it together.  It’s worked particularly well with kiddos whose stress leads to aggressive behaviors to head those off at the pass, break the cycle of guilt and anger that comes with them, and show them that they’re in control!

socialworkmemes:

Name an intervention for this guy. Go!

Redirect to an activity that produces a calming, uplifting, or empowering effect that can help break the cycle of stressful thinking and give them the chance to step back to a place where they can reframe.

I use this with kids when they’re stuck in cycles of negative thinking. Instead of trying to work it out while in the middle of an anxious response, we completely redirect to another activity — coloring, throwing a ball, running in circles, doing jumping jacks, doing mazes, talking about something they feel like an expert at. Then when they feel ready we look at the stressor and try to reframe it together. It’s worked particularly well with kiddos whose stress leads to aggressive behaviors to head those off at the pass, break the cycle of guilt and anger that comes with them, and show them that they’re in control!

(Source: larvitarr)

Filed under social work therapy education stress stress management always keep a coloring book on hand that goes for adults too

62 notes

When social workers try to hang out together

othersideofthecouch:

image

So I ran into, by sheer coincidence, a young group of equally nerdy people that included a therapist from another organization who was in the same program I had been at my previous job.

And we spend a good half of the time making DSM jokes, swapping horror stories, talking about vehicle contents (mobile work), commiserating with some of the other folks about gender issues and nonbinary status, and deliberating phrasing.

It was BEAUTIFUL. We were pretty excitable about it.

(via socialworkmemes)

2 notes

thekidscallmemskost reblogged your post shapefutures: Whether you don’t have … and added:

Fantastic idea! But… why cut off the crust? Crust is yummy too.

I am like a gigantic child and didn’t like the crust on this bread. (It was really, really cheap bread; the crust was a little like flaky cellophane.)  Plus, for the purposes of freezing, the crust can have some texture problems once you thaw it out.  

But I didn’t waste the crusts, if that makes anything better!  I saved them in a baggie to go a bit stale, and when I can get my mini blender into a dishwasher (I don’t have one of my own, and washing it by hand still didn’t get well enough into all the nooks and blades), I’ll be making them into breadcrumbs and freezing them, too!

Filed under thekidscallmemskost school year grub