Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

13,686 notes

socialworkmemes:

Name an intervention for this guy. Go!

Redirect to an activity that produces a calming, uplifting, or empowering effect that can help break the cycle of stressful thinking and give them the chance to step back to a place where they can reframe.I use this with kids when they’re stuck in cycles of negative thinking.  Instead of trying to work it out while in the middle of an anxious response, we completely redirect to another activity — coloring, throwing a ball, running in circles, doing jumping jacks, doing mazes, talking about something they feel like an expert at.  Then when they feel ready we look at the stressor and try to reframe it together.  It’s worked particularly well with kiddos whose stress leads to aggressive behaviors to head those off at the pass, break the cycle of guilt and anger that comes with them, and show them that they’re in control!

socialworkmemes:

Name an intervention for this guy. Go!

Redirect to an activity that produces a calming, uplifting, or empowering effect that can help break the cycle of stressful thinking and give them the chance to step back to a place where they can reframe.

I use this with kids when they’re stuck in cycles of negative thinking. Instead of trying to work it out while in the middle of an anxious response, we completely redirect to another activity — coloring, throwing a ball, running in circles, doing jumping jacks, doing mazes, talking about something they feel like an expert at. Then when they feel ready we look at the stressor and try to reframe it together. It’s worked particularly well with kiddos whose stress leads to aggressive behaviors to head those off at the pass, break the cycle of guilt and anger that comes with them, and show them that they’re in control!

(Source: larvitarr)

Filed under social work therapy education stress stress management always keep a coloring book on hand that goes for adults too

52 notes

When social workers try to hang out together

othersideofthecouch:

image

So I ran into, by sheer coincidence, a young group of equally nerdy people that included a therapist from another organization who was in the same program I had been at my previous job.

And we spend a good half of the time making DSM jokes, swapping horror stories, talking about vehicle contents (mobile work), commiserating with some of the other folks about gender issues and nonbinary status, and deliberating phrasing.

It was BEAUTIFUL. We were pretty excitable about it.

(via socialworkmemes)

2 notes

thekidscallmemskost reblogged your post shapefutures: Whether you don’t have … and added:

Fantastic idea! But… why cut off the crust? Crust is yummy too.

I am like a gigantic child and didn’t like the crust on this bread. (It was really, really cheap bread; the crust was a little like flaky cellophane.)  Plus, for the purposes of freezing, the crust can have some texture problems once you thaw it out.  

But I didn’t waste the crusts, if that makes anything better!  I saved them in a baggie to go a bit stale, and when I can get my mini blender into a dishwasher (I don’t have one of my own, and washing it by hand still didn’t get well enough into all the nooks and blades), I’ll be making them into breadcrumbs and freezing them, too!

Filed under thekidscallmemskost school year grub

8 notes

Today’s big question: How do you engage a four-month-old in an activity aligned with science objectives?

One of a number of possible answers: Texture.

One of the foundations of science is exploration, and very young children are naturally inquisitive and prone to exploring their environment.  Engaging babies in play that involves new textures — board books like Pat The Bunny, for example — start encouraging them early on to interact with their environment and teach them that there are many different properties to physical objects.  Giving them access (with supervision) to objects that have varied textures not only stimulates their curiosity, it also gives them more incentive to reach, grab, and feel.  Building these impulses early on, though it might not be great for caretakers with long hair or jewelry that little hands can grab, lays a good foundation for natural exploration later on and helps babies continue to develop a number of physical and cognitive skills (reaching, grabbing, depth perception, gross and fine motor, intentional interaction with objects, body awareness, etc.).

Filed under Things I'm learning at the new job Babies in the scientific sense are pretty awesome education

29 notes

shapefutures:

Whether you don’t have the time or energy to cook or don’t have a space to keep or prepare food at your school — or, like I was, if you’re spending a lot of your work time in the car — anything premade and edible with minimal setup or mess is pretty special.  And, if you’re on a budget (and if you’re in education or social services/human services you’re probably on a budget), you want to stretch your dollars.

Bread can come pretty cheap.  It can also go bad pretty quickly.  Today I picked up a loaf on clearance because it was on its last use-by day, and every month there’s some buy-one-get-one sale that I can’t quite take advantage of because I’m only one person.  But freezing bread extends the shelf-life. 

Which is good news for the budget AND for the stomach if you’re looking for something easy to prepare and convenient to have on hand when you need to run out the door and forgot to make lunch. Just snag one and by the time it’s time for lunch, it should be thawed and ready to eat.

(These are similar to those crustless frozen sandwiches you can get at supermarkets and gas stations, but cost half the price of a box to make the same amount and — if you’re in a nut-free school or are allergic like I am — can be made with whatever fillings you want.)

Brief update — I grabbed one of these on my way out the door and tossed it in my desk drawer. By the time I was working my way through my new developmental objectives I realized I’d never taken lunch, but was too deep in the books to go out.

It was great. It thawed without any change in texture in the jam or (non)peanut butter and the bread was neither dry nor soggy.

278 notes

sesamestreet:

We need a 4th for a doubles match. Who wants in?

#Sesame Street#Cookie Monster#US Open#elmo#abby cadabby#tennis ball isn’t a cookie :(I said, out loud, “Cookie Monster don’t eat the tennis ball.”Then I saw the tags.Yeah, I’m ready for my age group.

sesamestreet:

We need a 4th for a doubles match. Who wants in?

#Sesame Street#Cookie Monster#US Open#elmo#abby cadabby#tennis ball isn’t a cookie :(

I said, out loud, “Cookie Monster don’t eat the tennis ball.”

Then I saw the tags.

Yeah, I’m ready for my age group.

29 notes

Whether you don’t have the time or energy to cook or don’t have a space to keep or prepare food at your school — or, like I was, if you’re spending a lot of your work time in the car — anything premade and edible with minimal setup or mess is pretty special.  And, if you’re on a budget (and if you’re in education or social services/human services you’re probably on a budget), you want to stretch your dollars.

Bread can come pretty cheap.  It can also go bad pretty quickly.  Today I picked up a loaf on clearance because it was on its last use-by day, and every month there’s some buy-one-get-one sale that I can’t quite take advantage of because I’m only one person.  But freezing bread extends the shelf-life. 

Which is good news for the budget AND for the stomach if you’re looking for something easy to prepare and convenient to have on hand when you need to run out the door and forgot to make lunch. Just snag one and by the time it’s time for lunch, it should be thawed and ready to eat.

(These are similar to those crustless frozen sandwiches you can get at supermarkets and gas stations, but cost half the price of a box to make the same amount and — if you’re in a nut-free school or are allergic like I am — can be made with whatever fillings you want.)

Filed under food easy meals school year grub mobile work grub