Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

49 notes

When social workers try to hang out together

othersideofthecouch:

image

So I ran into, by sheer coincidence, a young group of equally nerdy people that included a therapist from another organization who was in the same program I had been at my previous job.

And we spend a good half of the time making DSM jokes, swapping horror stories, talking about vehicle contents (mobile work), commiserating with some of the other folks about gender issues and nonbinary status, and deliberating phrasing.

It was BEAUTIFUL. We were pretty excitable about it.

(via socialworkmemes)

2 notes

thekidscallmemskost reblogged your post shapefutures: Whether you don’t have … and added:

Fantastic idea! But… why cut off the crust? Crust is yummy too.

I am like a gigantic child and didn’t like the crust on this bread. (It was really, really cheap bread; the crust was a little like flaky cellophane.)  Plus, for the purposes of freezing, the crust can have some texture problems once you thaw it out.  

But I didn’t waste the crusts, if that makes anything better!  I saved them in a baggie to go a bit stale, and when I can get my mini blender into a dishwasher (I don’t have one of my own, and washing it by hand still didn’t get well enough into all the nooks and blades), I’ll be making them into breadcrumbs and freezing them, too!

Filed under thekidscallmemskost school year grub

8 notes

Today’s big question: How do you engage a four-month-old in an activity aligned with science objectives?

One of a number of possible answers: Texture.

One of the foundations of science is exploration, and very young children are naturally inquisitive and prone to exploring their environment.  Engaging babies in play that involves new textures — board books like Pat The Bunny, for example — start encouraging them early on to interact with their environment and teach them that there are many different properties to physical objects.  Giving them access (with supervision) to objects that have varied textures not only stimulates their curiosity, it also gives them more incentive to reach, grab, and feel.  Building these impulses early on, though it might not be great for caretakers with long hair or jewelry that little hands can grab, lays a good foundation for natural exploration later on and helps babies continue to develop a number of physical and cognitive skills (reaching, grabbing, depth perception, gross and fine motor, intentional interaction with objects, body awareness, etc.).

Filed under Things I'm learning at the new job Babies in the scientific sense are pretty awesome education

29 notes

shapefutures:

Whether you don’t have the time or energy to cook or don’t have a space to keep or prepare food at your school — or, like I was, if you’re spending a lot of your work time in the car — anything premade and edible with minimal setup or mess is pretty special.  And, if you’re on a budget (and if you’re in education or social services/human services you’re probably on a budget), you want to stretch your dollars.

Bread can come pretty cheap.  It can also go bad pretty quickly.  Today I picked up a loaf on clearance because it was on its last use-by day, and every month there’s some buy-one-get-one sale that I can’t quite take advantage of because I’m only one person.  But freezing bread extends the shelf-life. 

Which is good news for the budget AND for the stomach if you’re looking for something easy to prepare and convenient to have on hand when you need to run out the door and forgot to make lunch. Just snag one and by the time it’s time for lunch, it should be thawed and ready to eat.

(These are similar to those crustless frozen sandwiches you can get at supermarkets and gas stations, but cost half the price of a box to make the same amount and — if you’re in a nut-free school or are allergic like I am — can be made with whatever fillings you want.)

Brief update — I grabbed one of these on my way out the door and tossed it in my desk drawer. By the time I was working my way through my new developmental objectives I realized I’d never taken lunch, but was too deep in the books to go out.

It was great. It thawed without any change in texture in the jam or (non)peanut butter and the bread was neither dry nor soggy.

269 notes

sesamestreet:

We need a 4th for a doubles match. Who wants in?

#Sesame Street#Cookie Monster#US Open#elmo#abby cadabby#tennis ball isn’t a cookie :(I said, out loud, “Cookie Monster don’t eat the tennis ball.”Then I saw the tags.Yeah, I’m ready for my age group.

sesamestreet:

We need a 4th for a doubles match. Who wants in?

#Sesame Street#Cookie Monster#US Open#elmo#abby cadabby#tennis ball isn’t a cookie :(

I said, out loud, “Cookie Monster don’t eat the tennis ball.”

Then I saw the tags.

Yeah, I’m ready for my age group.

29 notes

Whether you don’t have the time or energy to cook or don’t have a space to keep or prepare food at your school — or, like I was, if you’re spending a lot of your work time in the car — anything premade and edible with minimal setup or mess is pretty special.  And, if you’re on a budget (and if you’re in education or social services/human services you’re probably on a budget), you want to stretch your dollars.

Bread can come pretty cheap.  It can also go bad pretty quickly.  Today I picked up a loaf on clearance because it was on its last use-by day, and every month there’s some buy-one-get-one sale that I can’t quite take advantage of because I’m only one person.  But freezing bread extends the shelf-life. 

Which is good news for the budget AND for the stomach if you’re looking for something easy to prepare and convenient to have on hand when you need to run out the door and forgot to make lunch. Just snag one and by the time it’s time for lunch, it should be thawed and ready to eat.

(These are similar to those crustless frozen sandwiches you can get at supermarkets and gas stations, but cost half the price of a box to make the same amount and — if you’re in a nut-free school or are allergic like I am — can be made with whatever fillings you want.)

Filed under food easy meals school year grub mobile work grub

72,143 notes

Things I want to tell people, that I wish people had told me:

hello-the-future:

  • You don’t have to achieve great things by the time you’re 25
  • You have intrinsic value above and beyond your perceived utility to other people and society at large. 
  • You don’t have to have sex, or have sex in any way that you find uncomfortable or unpleasant, to keep anyone’s love or good opinion of you. They didn’t love you or think very well of you to start with if they demand it. 
  • You don’t have to stay with someone who isn’t meeting your emotional or sexual needs because they need you, or you’ve been with them for awhile, or you need to be in a relationship. You need you. Your time is your own and it is finite. 
  • It’s ok to work at a job you enjoy that doesn’t make you miserable even if it’s not a career and it won’t “lead to anything.” 
  • Your life is not a narrative. It is not leading to anything, there is no overarching thesis, it does not have themes beyond the usual shared cultural experiences of your time and place. This is ok. It does not mean that your life is without purpose or meaning. 
  • It’s ok not to like or get along with the vast majority of people you encounter, so long as you afford them the same respect, courtesy and dignity that they afford you. 
  • Expensive is not always better. 
  • Failure is temporary if you’re still alive. 
  • People are both much better and much worse than you’d suspect, but usually not all at once. 
  • Stop thinking of your future self as a different person and it will be easier to prevent money and health problems. 
  • Let people help you, lean on them when you need to, and be available to help, but don’t swing too far in either direction. Try to carry your half of the life basket as evenly as you can. 
  • Set boundaries, and do not be afraid to kick people out of your life who disregard them. You will not end up alone and unloved. People who love you will be ok with your boundaries. 
  • Your power does not come from money or beauty, but from seeing life steadily and wholly, from a curious and thoughtful mind, and from your ability to say no when you want to, and yes when you want to, and I don’t know when you don’t know. 
  • There will be bad times, maybe lots of bad times, but not only bad times. 
  • Love will not heal the wounds in your soul, but love can give you the impetus to begin the work of healing yourself. 
  • Life might be a long series of starting over, and that’s alright. 
  • You’re really cool, you’re really beautiful, you’re really special. Really. Not to everyone, but to a lot of someones sometimes.

<3

(Source: sehnsuchttraum, via twapa)

8 notes

New Job:

  • I have my own little office. Four walls and a door that closes.  Office.  
  • We have materials to work with.  
  • There are several sizable books’ worth, bound as well as photocopied-and-clipped, of information for me to read, absorb, and be able to use and teach. 
  • I get to do multiple kinds of assessments.
  • My head is spinning.