Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

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twitter-simplyhayley:

girlwithalessonplan:

teachinglearning:

edunewbie:

girlwithalessonplan:

shapefutures:

monasequeda:

allisonunsupervised:

populationpensive:

teachinglearning:Ta-da! This is a my new classroom management consequence ladder tracking chart that I’m going to implement this year for my 8th graders!  I’m adapting to it because one big problem that I ran into in my classroom management last year was that my students would instantly shut down once they received a writing assignment as a consequence.  This new method enables the student the power to correct their behavior and move out of the negative consequences and back into positive ones by the end of the class period; actually encouraging them to correct their behavior!

Now just 6 more to make and a ton a clothespins to buy!

Comments? Questions?uh I have so many extra clip boards that I should consider doing this

[snipped by GWALP]

Then, my dear, we live in a world of semantics.  Writing is writing.  Authority is authority.  Whether the consequence is overtly related to the material or not, consequences are things that ought not be enjoyed for the sake of doing, but things that ought to lift up a person to a new emotion.  Please, #education, enlighten this bad teacher with your ideas on the context.  I’m truly all ears.  All I ask is that you be civil and not hijack for the sake of stating a message.  I want you to bring something to the table that I can learn from, not bash for it’s insensitiveness.

I didn’t see anyone calling you a bad teacher.

Nor did I see anyone call this insensitive, but in other terms, many of us call this misguided.

As others have said, writing as a form of punishment can instill a dislike of writing, which is the opposite of what we as teachers want.  Someone else made the point that, “I don’t make students do math problems, so why make kids write?”

Shape-futures said she does believe in apology letters, but I don’t even believe in forcing those.  I have *suggested* to students, “I think it would be good of you to write a letter of apology if you can find the the words to say.” I don’t make them do it. Only ONCE have I had a student NOT do it.  I don’t feel you are really fostering a genuine thought process of regret or the act of asking for forgiveness.  

Writing for punishment, or any punishment, often does not “lift a person up to new emotion.”  It can often foster many negative feelings—the opposite of what you want if not administered properly, effectively, or with known consequences. 

I like that you make consequences of actions very, very clear.  You do put student ownership into play there—YOU ARE MAKING THEM THE AUTHORITY by doing this.  You cannot say, “authority is authority” because students need to feel empowered in your class, not overpowered.  And you are giving them clear choices here.

I wonder how it would work if “teachers choice” was actually “student choice” and they had to choose from various tasks or reprimands: loss of lunch with friends, loss of recess, clean boards, or maybe even include the writing as a CHOICE so it’s not the only ultimatum.    

then, after the “student choice” you call home.  I wonder if you should be calling home much sooner.  You have it as the fourth strike, essentially.  

We are a community who wants to help, and when #education sees something we feel strongly about, then we tend to react in a knee-jerk way.

But I was being brutally honest with you:  As a hypothetical parent, I would be furious if you used writing as a punishment for my kid.  You would hear from me.  I would ask for my kid to have after school detention and help clean your room or something.

 How would you deal with me, as a parent, if I said no to your form of punishment (regardless of what that punishment is)?


I love this idea! If the child thinks that writing is a punishment, he/she is probably not the best writer and could use some improvement anyhow. Don’t get in trouble, and you won’t have to write. Simple as that.

But they will have to write.  They’ll have to write every day.  They’ll have to write for almost every subject.  They’ll have to write for tests, for assignments, for expression, for labs, for just about everything.

Students have to write. Writing is not a negative consequence that can be removed if they do well and avoid negative behaviors.

If a student has trouble with writing, forcing them to practice because they did something they shouldn’t have isn’t going to help them.  It’s going to make them hate something that they likely already hate because they’re not good at it.  If you lack confidence and skill in something and someone forces you to do it as a punishment and justifies it because you need practice, how would that make you feel?  Would it help your confidence?

(via simplyhayley)

Filed under education writing classroom management behavior management

  1. funnytomebc reblogged this from teachinglearning
  2. musicedresources reblogged this from teachinglearning
  3. livsinglove reblogged this from teachinglearning and added:
    Already use this!! However it doesn’t have candy on top. The students who reach the top two tiers, instead is called...
  4. iwokedreaming reblogged this from teachinglearning
  5. eelaalee reblogged this from teachinglearning
  6. missionofgettingaway reblogged this from shapefutures and added:
    Discovered on TumTum ♻
  7. learningandcreating reblogged this from teachinglearning
  8. 3beaglemomma reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan
  9. emmyk724 reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan and added:
    Somehow I don’t think this will have the same effect with my high school kids…
  10. rayfoxy reblogged this from shapefutures
  11. theroundandthelovely reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan and added:
    Another option: create a rewards/point system where kids can earn points for bags of chips, get out of homework cards,...
  12. jubaah reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan
  13. radiate-all-good reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan
  14. girlwithalessonplan reblogged this from teachinglearning and added:
    You haven’t made yourself very clear and I haven’t followed you long enough to know your age group. Maybe with...
  15. teachinglearning reblogged this from shapefutures and added:
    Thanks to many of you for your encouragement and suggestions, I hope this in some way is beneficial to you. Clearing the...
  16. whydressinborrowedrobes reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan
  17. mariiterrazas reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan
  18. lbschool reblogged this from girlwithalessonplan and added:
    It seems impossible to not strive for candy.
  19. april2383 reblogged this from shapefutures and added:
    Okay, so I see this and I like it but how does the system work? Please and thank you! :-)
  20. openloveopenhugs reblogged this from positivelypersistentteach