Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged certification

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Perfect score and a certification, huh? Now you’re the PERFECT unemployed teacher! Seriously though I’m very proud of you, now get off the phone you’ve still got a cold.
Dad.  Ah the warm wisdom of parents.  My browser is a cascade of tabs from SchoolSpring and Craigslist, but at least I can give a certificate number now instead of “expected in ______”

Filed under education parents certification

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Cost of Working (Provided I Find a Full-Time Job)

msleahhbic:

shapefutures:

I just finished the second-to-last step of my certification process, and was privy to some new information about my college that makes everything about the last year of struggling to get this done make more sense. 

I also forked over more money.  So here’s an exercise in accounting.  For ease, everything has been rounded to the nearest dollar.

State fee for fingerprinting: $92

Site fee for fingerprinting: $30

Liberal Arts and Sciences Test: $79

Assessment of Teaching Skills - Written: $79

Multi-Subject CST: $79

Child Abuse workshop: $40

Violence Prevention workshop: $40

Not including school itself. 

Well…I really hope this turns out to be worth it.

I’m taking on a second job just so I can afford to pay for all of these next year. If NYC needs teachers so badly, why don’t they subsidize these hmm? 

NYC had actually been on a hiring freeze for a while with the exception of certain high-needs areas — math, science, bilingual, special ed, etc. (though they’re open again to all applications from what I understand, which is a big relief) — and for those areas, and IF you don’t already have certification or an education background, and IF you can get into the program, the NY Teaching Fellows offers a subsidized Master’s and certification. 

If you decide to work on those things from the get-go, well, you’re SOL.  I’m not sure what message they’re trying to send with that, but then, I don’t know what message school districts try to send by enacting hiring restrictions or freezes and then bringing in TfA, either.

More and more, it looks like the most fruitful way to go is to NOT go into education from the get-go, but career-change and go through alternative routes. One would think that it would be more fruitful to put some of the money they have for things like TfA into subsidizing certification for people going the traditional route provided they dedicate x number of years to teaching in high-needs districts or areas; I’d thought I’d opted into a financial assistance program based on that idea in NY State but never got any more information about it, so either I didn’t fit their criteria, they did away with the program before I was finished, or the program just wasn’t run effectively.

(via msleahhrhhbic)

Filed under education certification teacher certification teach for america money teaching fellowships

12 notes

Cost of Working (Provided I Find a Full-Time Job)

I just finished the second-to-last step of my certification process, and was privy to some new information about my college that makes everything about the last year of struggling to get this done make more sense. 

I also forked over more money.  So here’s an exercise in accounting.  For ease, everything has been rounded to the nearest dollar.

State fee for fingerprinting: $92

Site fee for fingerprinting: $30

Liberal Arts and Sciences Test: $79

Assessment of Teaching Skills - Written: $79

Multi-Subject CST: $79

Child Abuse workshop: $40

Violence Prevention workshop: $40

Not including school itself. 

Well…I really hope this turns out to be worth it.

Filed under education certification teacher certification money

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How to structure an online workshop vs. how not to structure an online workshop.

Because employment whisked me out of state, I’m finishing up my mandatory last pieces toward certification online.  The workshops in person are usually about three hours long, and online they’re structured as complete-at-your-own-pace courses that in theory shouldn’t take much longer.

Please, if you’re designing a mandatory workshop that’s supposed to give us background to make us better teachers, do not hand us nothing but twelve chapters (plus an introduction and a bonus chapter of hotline numbers) of text and then one or two cumulative quizzes.  The second workshop has literally no graphics, no separate documents, no articles, nothing.  It is one long scrolling collection of text occasionally divided into chapters, all of which run into one another with minimal distinction.

If you’re going to teach teachers, keep in mind that they still benefit from many of the same basic techniques you’d use when teaching kids.

Filed under education higher ed higher eduation online learning certification

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Never flee the state before you finish your paperwork.

Finally got on the phone with the woman in the teacher certification office at my college.  Apparently there was a piece I have to do on my own, an account thing online, because everything is done digitally now, before I CAN fill out my paperwork.  

(Embarrassed admission: this whole process has been incredibly confusing for me and at one point made me doubt my ability to teach.)

Thank you oh alma mater for helping me through the process.  When it comes to this, their largest program, I say “The Personal College my foot.” If you are becoming a teacher anytime soon, never, ever trust your program to give you all the information you need.  That is not to say that they won’t, and that they are bad programs — it’s just important to be your own biggest advocate.

So anyway I’m not the most savvy creature when it comes to certain online systems, but once I do this, I can call her up and set up an appointment back in NY during the week sometime to sit down and fill things out, and aside from the fingerprinting workshop, the only two pieces I’m missing can be done entirely online.

Then, then I’ll have my actual certification.  And then I can try for a job a ways southward where I think there are still some left if you don’t mind avoiding certain colors and are not terrified by the remote possibility (remote!) of being stabbed.  To that climate I say: taught there, dealt with that.  Those are students that need a safe space and I am ready.

(But darnit, I wish I’d had the foresight to study Spanish instead of French and Japanese so I could work in Holyoke.)

Filed under education certification

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Like Tolkien Except Less Climactic

a Friday in March: After waiting for the refund to come in from the school so I have enough money, finally register for NYSTCE ATS-W and LAST.  Choose one county over, an hour away. 

System glitches and tells me to call.  Office is closed until Monday.

next Monday in March:  Call the office.  The only downstate testing sites with open spots now are Staten Island and the Bronx.  Choose the latter.  Always room for adventure.

Thursday night: Gain very sweet secret-not-so-secret admirer.  Schedule coffee Friday night.

Friday night before date: Find out that, because of the awkward gap in train times at exactly when I need one, the train I need to catch will be at 3:45 in the morning.  Dammit.  Well…naps are better than nothing.

Friday night after date…and morning after date:  Can’t sleep.  In fact, don’t.  At all.

Saturday, 3am:  Packed to stay the night at a friend’s house, have brother start the car for me.

3:10am: Can’t find boots.

3:20am: Car informs me on the way that it needs gas desperately.  I’ll get gas on the way home on Sunday, forget it.

3:41am: After catching every other light and getting stuck behind a pair of the slowest drivers ever to hit the road before 4 in the morning, pull into a parking space and grab my stuff.  Run for the train.

3:43am:  Get to the doors…as they close and the train pulls away.  Either they are running fast or my phone is running slow.

3:47am: No panic…get back into the car.  I can get gas and beat the train to the next major train station about an hour away.  I’ve done this before.

The car will not start.

It continues not to start for the next fifteen minutes.  And then reminds me that I have no gas.

Other train is not happening.

3:57am: Call my friend in Astoria who is just getting up for work.  Ask about parking near him.  Just a municipal lot.  Only takes quarters.  Four dollars. 

Exchange singles at the gas station.  Grab a vitaminwater, roll, protein bar.  Mm breakfast.

Guess we’re driving.

Sometime just before 5am:   Arrive in Queens after playing it by ear when directions were missing a step.  Get on the subway into Manhattan.

5:32am: Arrive in Manhattan and discover that to get to the high school in the Bronx for the tests without being so early that I end up stuck out in the cold for an hour, I shouldn’t take the subway up there until 6:48am.

Grab some fruit at a Duane Reade and try to waste some time in there. 

5:59am: Walk down to a Starbucks I found using the maps app on my phone.  It would be open at 6…on a weekday. 

Stand out in the cold for almost an hour.

6:48am: Catch the subway to the Bronx.

7:13am: Get there.  And wait.

8:40am: Finally start the test.  Finish just before noon.

2:03pm: Finally start the second test, with its 1pm arrive-by time.

Honest to whatever is out there…by the time I got to the tests themselves they weren’t even that big a deal anymore.

Filed under nystce odyssey I better pass these things certification exams education