Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged classroom environment

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girlwithalessonplan:

novicephoenix:

Finally, here are some photos of our library…this is what Tumblr has helped me to create. Thank you so much guys. The donations keep coming in. I just want you to know that you’re really helping my kids out.

I want to be on that bean bag right. now. 

This looks great.  

How did I miss this before?  This is so bright and colorful — and HAPPY.  I would love coming in every day to this space, whether I was the teacher or the student.  (Loving all the plants too, that’s a great way to keep a room healthy.)

Filed under education classroom environment

83 notes

We've Got A Diem to Carpe: Today.

adiemtocarpe:

I started off bright, cheery and excited. I greeted my students at the door with a pencil and a plastic bag filled with cut up sentence strip that when put together was a short letter from me to them expressing my excitement for the year. Then, it just went downhill.

We tried playing a name game,…

When I’m dealing with a “tough crowd” I try to make it a two-way conversation while still being firm.  It might sound pessimistic, but my goal for the first day is, before having fun, to lay down the ground rules and start off a relationship with strict guidelines for mutual respect.

You can still be fun, but if the students see that your primary objective is to be fun they’re going to walk all over you.

I find it’s most effective if I make it clear right off that bat that they’re going to have a certain responsibility for their own education; that I have faith in them; and that I am to a certain degree responsible to them as well.  Once they hear that they have a role in the way the classroom is going to be run they pay more attention.  Instead of laying down rules, I tell them my expectations for them, and then I ask them about their expectations for me — and I tell them that we’re going to talk about them, that I take their input seriously, and so to please take the activity seriously because this is our classroom, not mine.

I don’t know if any of that will help you, but I hope it might give you some ideas.  Don’t be afraid, either, to ask people at school for help, to talk to some of their previous teachers, etc.; it isn’t a show of weakness or lack of competence, it’s a recognition that someone has worked with these students before you, and that they may have some advice that can help you work with their behavior so that you CAN get to all the awesome, fun activities you had planned.

And above all, don’t lose the cheerfulness.  It will show your students that you’re resilient, that you’re not giving up, and maybe it will make some of them back down when they realize they’re not going to chase you off.

Filed under behavior management disruptive behavior classroom management classroom environment education teaching

1 note

Izzyshare has me thinking more and more about an ideal classroom environment and what I might do with mine.  These are a must.

I first saw these in the Union Square Holiday Market and fell in love with them — they’re called “pozies” (like positivity?) and combine to create mix-and-match uplifting messages of love and encouragement.  I almost bought one then and there, but I knew I had neither the money nor the space to get something on the spot for a room I didn’t have yet.  They are, however, online, and even do custom work.

Pictured is one of my favorites, and the one that would most likely find its way into my class.  My other favorite reads: live / life, loudly / proudly, with purpose / to appreciate, with honor / to create, which is also an especially good message for anyone in the education (or nonprofit fields, or arts, or military, or anyone else you could think of who would be struck by these words), not just for students.

You could create these yourself easily enough, whether with the same materials or with posterboard and magazine clippings of meaningful words.  You might even try something like this for synonyms or antonyms, or other vocabulary exercises — it’s something a little different compared to the usual posters or word walls.

Izzyshare has me thinking more and more about an ideal classroom environment and what I might do with mine.  These are a must.

I first saw these in the Union Square Holiday Market and fell in love with them — they’re called “pozies” (like positivity?) and combine to create mix-and-match uplifting messages of love and encouragement.  I almost bought one then and there, but I knew I had neither the money nor the space to get something on the spot for a room I didn’t have yet.  They are, however, online, and even do custom work.

Pictured is one of my favorites, and the one that would most likely find its way into my class.  My other favorite reads: live / life, loudly / proudly, with purpose / to appreciate, with honor / to create, which is also an especially good message for anyone in the education (or nonprofit fields, or arts, or military, or anyone else you could think of who would be struck by these words), not just for students.

You could create these yourself easily enough, whether with the same materials or with posterboard and magazine clippings of meaningful words.  You might even try something like this for synonyms or antonyms, or other vocabulary exercises — it’s something a little different compared to the usual posters or word walls.

Filed under classroom environment shopping decoration vocabulary positivity education