Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged comics

61 notes

Scholastic: Make your own Graphic Novel

positivelypersistentteach:

Ohh.  If only I had access to a computer lab or computers for kids to use in my room.  They would love this!

Students choose layouts, graphics, and write their own stories — then they can print it out.  I would add some of these to my classroom library!

The kids back at my middle school program last year LOVED this.  It worked beautifully.

If you can’t do this digitally, it takes a bit of work, but you can show them how to make collage and copy-comics.  Cut out word balloons (or find those word balloon stickers for photos) and print out a few pages of sprites or stock photos with people or creatures in different poses or expressions. Students can draw their own characters or backgrounds, too — or you could even have them use stick figures.

You can also photocopy comics with the word balloons whited out — I know quite a few ELL teachers who do this abroad.  Then, students write in their own dialogue for what they think is going on.

It isn’t ideal, and in some cases either limits creativity or makes choice too much work for what some students want to undertake. But it works with the right circumstances if computers aren’t available.

(via positivelypersistentteach)

Filed under education comics

219 notes

jekoh:

“For Teachers When They Feel Like Giving Up”

This whole thing was spurred by an absolutely beautiful post by PositivelyPersistentTeach about her first grade teacher, a supportive letter to the #education community when a lot of people were having hard times.  So if you like this, you should definitely go read that, because it made me realize with renewed hope that working with kids is what I want to do.

(I don’t know why, but not all of the pages seem to be showing up; if that keeps happening drop me a message in my ask and I’ll see what I can do about it.)

I may make this a (small) copybook that can be purchased at MoCCA.

Portfolio blog here

Jone Ekoh’s other major comic project here

Studio blog here

So here’s the thing…when I made this I was so nervous about how it might be received that I put it on my personal/art blog, thinking that maybe the few teachers who watch me there might give it a nod or a no and then I would figure out what to do from there.

And then this happened.

So.  Um.  If people are interested, I’ll be making this into a copy book, which I’ll see if I can make available here — I might have to do it through the studio site for the sake of organization and things, I might have to charge like, a dollar, to cover printing costs and whatnot, sorry, sorry, I wish I could do it for free but I’m just making all my financial necessaries right now — and it was suggested that it be a poster, so if anyone wants that I can figure that out…

I’m a bit overwhelmed here.

Just so you know…I cried when I wrote it, partly from sheer relief.  I cried a little when I reread it for editing.  And I’m so glad that it touched other people in the way I hoped it might, because what I really wanted was to give other people who sometimes feel that way so many of us were feeling a little bit of hope, a little push back up.  I’m really so glad that it did that for some people.  Thank you.

(via positivelypersistentteach)

Filed under education comics

1 note

Rainbow Jones

We started doing character profiles.  For every half an hour that they work on the week’s challenge — this one being creating characters — during homework time, they get a piece of currency that lets them into a prize closet.

So far nearly all the kids who started have gone far beyond homework time and currency, and have started forming stories with other kids, and it’s all tying into one great big universe, and that’s what we hoped would happen.  Bwahahaha.  Subversive education.

I poked my head downstairs to ask an older student, who’d been all for the activity until we actually started it and decided it was “too much work,” what kind of character I should make.  She said snidely, “One that explains you.”  She thought she was insulting me.  But I am becoming fairly immune to her insults in particular.

Instead I went upstairs and designed a character that “explain[ed] me.”  She’s an alien from a planet where good words create a good atmosphere — literally, things like sunshine and fresh air and flowers — and negative words make nasty little clouds that block out the sun.  She comes to earth and assumes the name Rainbow Jones.  She is, of course, a superhero: some kind of ridiculous combination of Sailor Moon, Wonder Woman, Rainbow Brite, and Jessie the Yodeling Cowgirl.

Apparently she caught on.  Now three different students — and the other staff member, thanks boss! — have fashioned characters who are villains, including, to date, an evil cheerleader and her two sidekick prankster siblings.  The collaboration came completely organically, after other attempts at producing a collaborative work failed.  Everyone just wants to beat all the sunshine out of Rainbow Jones, though with affection.

Now they’re talking about how cool it would be to play it out like a LARP, though they don’t realize it’s a LARP that they’re talking about.  So I’ve made the costume as dress-up-able as possible.  On top of that, I’m putting together a little comic for them to add on to, whether that be in the form of writing, drawing, or inking (I am so excited, they’re learning about art pen widths, pencil sharpness, and building figures out of shapes) that we hope to sell at the few cons I’m hitting this season, specifically to raise money for the program.

It’s ridiculous.  And I promise you all that the Adventures of Rainbow Jones will at some point be posted, whether here or on an offshoot blog, depending on how much we churn out.

Filed under education art comics rainbow jones writing I'm beginning to think that everyone secretly wants to beat me up

2,774 notes

secondlina:

eastofthemoon:

cutiemarkcrusaders:

steveholtvstheuniverse:

cuteosphere:

MY LITTLE FANDOM: CENSORSHIP IS MAGIC

Comic about something that was weighing heavily on my mind recently

This comic is brilliant.

At the end of the day, it’s still a kid’s show, folks.

Keep this in mind, everypony!

Yeah, this is something I wish artists/writer of adult pony material would realize.

Very important. I believe in freedom of speech and all that, but we gotta remember that the target market should be respected too.

Reblogging on the education end because it’s something that those who are not in these circles — whose students use the internet and happen to like things with strong adult fanbases — might want to know exists. 

This isn’t meant to be alarmist.  Not every member of every fandom is like this, but every fandom has a few.

Filed under education comics fandom internet fiction

1,105 notes

johnmartz:

For the second year in a row, I had the honour of creating the poster for the Jay Kennedy Memorial Scholarship.
Awarded by the National Cartoonists Society Foundation, the scholarship gives $5000 to a promising student cartoonist every year. The scholarship is open to any student in the US, Canada and Mexico, and you do not need to be an art student.
More information is available at the NCSF website, and I encourage all students with cartooning in their blood to apply.
You can see the poster I did for last year’s scholarship.
EDIT: Here’s a high-res printable PDF of this year’s poster if you want to print it out for your school or comic shop.

I took cards back to the after school program with me from New York Comic Con advertising this scholarship.  My students were too young for it, but they were amazed that something they loved to do in their spare time (that some of them were made fun of for on occasion) could earn them scholarship money.

Show this to your students.  You never know who might secretly be making comics about your class in the backs of their notebooks during study period.  And even if they’re not in the right age group to earn a scholarship, it will give a whole new validation (and maybe help their motivation) to a worthwhile hobby.

johnmartz:

For the second year in a row, I had the honour of creating the poster for the Jay Kennedy Memorial Scholarship.

Awarded by the National Cartoonists Society Foundation, the scholarship gives $5000 to a promising student cartoonist every year. The scholarship is open to any student in the US, Canada and Mexico, and you do not need to be an art student.

More information is available at the NCSF website, and I encourage all students with cartooning in their blood to apply.

You can see the poster I did for last year’s scholarship.

EDIT: Here’s a high-res printable PDF of this year’s poster if you want to print it out for your school or comic shop.

I took cards back to the after school program with me from New York Comic Con advertising this scholarship.  My students were too young for it, but they were amazed that something they loved to do in their spare time (that some of them were made fun of for on occasion) could earn them scholarship money.

Show this to your students.  You never know who might secretly be making comics about your class in the backs of their notebooks during study period.  And even if they’re not in the right age group to earn a scholarship, it will give a whole new validation (and maybe help their motivation) to a worthwhile hobby.

(via jerzydrozd)

Filed under education art comics scholarship illustration animation cartoons

4 notes

The Last Day of Our Extracurricular Program

  • A video was made over the course of the last semester featuring nearly all the staff and many of the students in the program.  Though I was there when it was being filmed, I was not a part of it more than a pair of glimpses in the background.  I admit that when I was watching it with the students, who cheered and shouted when any of the staff showed up, it felt a bit like being the kid left behind at their own lunch table, especially since at Talent Night, Mr. P announced his hurried thanks at the end of the show to everyone but myself and another newer staff member.  I know it has to do with the time we’d been there, but I was a bit concerned that maybe I hadn’t made much of an impact.
  • Inside, a speaker from the library showed a “cool” video about all the great summer programs they have.  The programs were awesome, and by the end of the day a few students even picked up the calendars she left to look them over (voluntarily, that is; everyone went home with one whether they necessarily wanted one or not).  But the video…my gosh, I had to keep from laughing at some of the cheesiness while telling the students to stop.  When it started using music that was familiar to them, whole groups of them started singing aloud and dancing in their seats, and I think at that point most of us were just grateful that they were no longer trying to talk through it and we let it happen.  They even slipped “Fix You” by Coldplay in there somewhere, at which point I turned to Miss N, the intern-turned-paid-volunteer who’d been forgotten with me the other night, and whispered “They don’t know this song.  This is old people music.  WE know this song.”
  • Outside, we managed to assemble all of the students into some semblance of lines to get pizza.  The DJ (it was an all-out last-day party) put on some Justin Beiber, to which I for some reason knew the words.  I proceeded to overdramatically, cheesily lip-sync to my female colleague standing next to me — because she happened to be the one standing next to me — who immediately cracked up.  I’ve been oddly mature at this job, no one has seen me act my goofy self.  Well, by the time I had my hand over my heart and my other arm out gesturing wildly, practically down on one knee, pleading “Baby baby baby,” the students and staff all though I had lost it.  But hey — they laughed, and this is me.  So it was worth it.  I’m just sad I didn’t act naturally earlier on; lesson learned for the next time.
  • I managed to make twenty school photocopier copies, with “Pre-Release Edition” scrawled in a jagged bubble on the front, of the comic book the students created. When I gave S his copy, he read through it and proceeded to carry it around with him for the next hour and a half outside.  The final copy will include two more students’ comics than were featured in today’s and be out next week, their last week of school. 
  • When one of the video gamer boys was disappointed because we had run out of comic books, I told him that next week when he got his copy he ought to have all the students featured in it sign it, because they might be famous one day.  Really, it was because I know it will make those students feel great.  (There’s a specific experience that lead me to this idea, actually, and I’m going to have to make a post about “classroom publishing” later.)
  • I met S’s mother; his bag ripped so I helped him carry his things.  She asked, “You’re…going to be here next year right?  Doing this?”  My heart broke; my assumption had been that I was leaving.
  • On the office refrigerator is a large card that wasn’t there before.  It’s actually a flat piece of construction paper, with another color overlayed and a big heart in the middle, the staff’s names written around it.  It’s an end of year thank-you we’ll-miss-you (because Summer is forever) note.  And it had my name too. 
  • I told my supervisor that I would find a way to come back at least once a week to help continue the comic program next year.

Filed under education last day extracurricular comics students celebrations

26 notes

S is one of my middle schoolers.  He has a learning disorder that, among other things, seems to inhibit his handwriting. He can manage a few words here and there, but for sentences it seems he just trails off, possibly because these are drafts we’re working on.  His recall, however, is amazing, and his creativity endless.  

Initially, it was hard to tell what was the average uncertainty of creating something new and which inconsistencies were something I could help him with — he frequently forgot the villain’s name, for example, and if he forgot to number his pages and I didn’t catch it, it might be a toss-up in the beginning as to whether we’d be able to piece the drafts back together.  I know nothing about these students when I start working with them, have no access to IEPs or the teachers that work with them every day, and aside from asking what’s difficult for them I’m never quite sure how to approach the issue (which, one student showed by letting me read to him for twenty minutes, is not always the way to go either). 

S was straightforward — he told me that the hand-writing component might be difficult.  I suggested he draw right from the beginning for the drafts.  He was also not particularly confident in his skills as an artist.  Confidence was a weakness for him in general, and so, to some degree, was trying something he felt he might not be good in, or that required “too much work.”  But it was soon very apparent that storytelling wasn’t.  Every week he has new episodes to recount for me, with details he constructs on the spot. 

These aren’t fleeting.  They’re recalled week after week, in sequence, and now he’s put together a whole season in his head.

With a little bit of nudging toward trying to at least make a sketch for himself, he gave a reluctant try.  The issue was just getting it into a final copy that he could enjoy making and that others could read. 

Enter toondo.  After one session walking through the tools together, he knows how to use it better than me.  Now, between final pages, he stops and exclaims that he’s going to draft the next page, grabs a piece of paper, and pencils four at a time.  He declared last week that he’s going to talk to the principal about leaving copies of each issue in the library for students to read so that he can become famous.

It’s just a great example of what students can create when they have the right tools.  (And when this is turned into a Saturday morning cartoon, you’d better believe I’ll be ready with these drafts and a felt-tipped pen for his signature.) 

And the idea of the online comic generator?  Saw it on tumblr.  This is a good thing for education.

Filed under education extracurricular comic comics edtech technology

0 notes

Highlights of the day:

  • Students keep showing up to tutoring that I have never seen before, and becoming regulars.
  • I had to argue “Brendan” back to his homeroom, because he was done with his homework but just wanted to hang out with me some more.  I’ve gotten approval to start pulling tutoring hours on more days during the week.
  • "Shanna" came back for the first time to comic book club today…and churned out five pages worth of very manga-typical, exciting script (complete with student running late out of the door with toast in her mouth).
  • "Hal" (…Devin renamed this student, this seems to explain the level of sheer geekitude on this one) finally got to use an online comic generator today.  He has severely limited writing skills, and his drafts, rather than scripts, are panels with his own stick figures and scrawled notes, but they’re translating beautifully and thoughtfully into great pages.  I love watching him work through all the details of making the pre-set characters, props, and backgrounds work to fit his story.
  • We were stuck in the video game room — the classroom where the gaming club sets up the Wii and the Playstation and proceeds to scream through the hour and a half of club time — but collected two defectors who, rather than just wait for a turn at the controllers, sat down and scripted comics instead.
  • On a break, while everyone was working independently, I pwned one of my female students in Wii boxing.  I am now the princess of nerds in that school, and those girls did not break into one more fight for the remainder of the session.
  • I demonstrated a light box and prismacolor pens for the first time today, and with the students’ responses, might as well have been doing Houdini-level magic tricks.  It was great to see them so excited about something I tend to see as frustrating and mundane.  I don’t think I could take it for granted again — now it’s all magic to me, too.
  • "Jay" came back for the first time since they started rehearsing for Talent Night.  When he first came back to the room, it was "I’m going to see if I can start coming for the second half on Tuesdays."  Within ten minutes it was "I’m going to see if I can come HERE at the beginning on Tuesdays."  By the end of the session, it became "Wow, I’m gonna come here on Tuesdays again."

Filed under education highlights tutoring comics extracurricular awesome day