Cathedral Building

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Posts tagged education

79 notes

gjmueller:

Nebraska school suggests teachers avoid calling students boys or girls to be ‘gender inclusive’

A Lincoln middle school staffer gave teachers training documents advising them not to use “gendered expressions” by calling students “boys and girls” or “ladies and gentlemen,” but to instead use more generic expressions like campers, readers, athletes or even purple penguins to be more “gender inclusive.”
Lincoln Superintendent Steve Joel told KLIN Radio’s Drive Time Lincoln show Wednesday he was “happy” and “pleased” with the training materials because the school district wants all children to be successful and not feel like outcasts or be afraid to go to school. He said the school district needs to be inclusive and educate and understand all children and address bullying.


When I was working in the classroom (and now whenever there’s a group activity), I used:
- friends
- everybody
- randomly paired objects — this one was particularly fun for kids who were old enough to get that I was poking at the binary, and then sorted themselves into things like buses and trains or giraffes and kangaroos or cups and plates.  And if you keep switching it up, no one can associate and tease or assign gendered traits. (That and it makes the kids laugh.)

gjmueller:

Nebraska school suggests teachers avoid calling students boys or girls to be ‘gender inclusive’

A Lincoln middle school staffer gave teachers training documents advising them not to use “gendered expressions” by calling students “boys and girls” or “ladies and gentlemen,” but to instead use more generic expressions like campers, readers, athletes or even purple penguins to be more “gender inclusive.”

Lincoln Superintendent Steve Joel told KLIN Radio’s Drive Time Lincoln show Wednesday he was “happy” and “pleased” with the training materials because the school district wants all children to be successful and not feel like outcasts or be afraid to go to school. He said the school district needs to be inclusive and educate and understand all children and address bullying.

When I was working in the classroom (and now whenever there’s a group activity), I used:

- friends

- everybody

- randomly paired objects — this one was particularly fun for kids who were old enough to get that I was poking at the binary, and then sorted themselves into things like buses and trains or giraffes and kangaroos or cups and plates.  And if you keep switching it up, no one can associate and tease or assign gendered traits. (That and it makes the kids laugh.)

Filed under education lgbtq gender

53 notes

smithsonianlvm:

NEW! Dia de los Muertos /Day of the Dead Chequea Esto!(Check This Out!) Animation Shorts on iTunes U

Download the Latino Virtual Museum’s Cheqea esto! (Check this out!) series on iTunes U featuring new animated short stories about the traditions and cultural practices of Dia de los Muertos told through animated characters Florentina and her wise Abuelita. Chequea esto! is a series of educational animated videos tackling issues popular among Latino youth. Topics include college applications, career paths, bullying, cultural tradition, and social media. Each video is quick, engaging, and fun!

Join us in celebrating and exploring Latino cultural heritage through this holiday for honoring the dead and the cycle of life and death. Learn different aspects of Día de los Muertos and how it is celebrated and practiced.

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a day of celebration for the people of Latin America, particularly in Mexico and Central America, and more recently for Mexican Americans. Rather than grieve over the loss of a beloved family or friend, they choose to commemorate the lives of the dearly departed and welcome the return of their spirits. The history of Day of the Dead is embedded with Pre-Hispanic and Spanishcustoms. These customs shaped the common elements of traditional Mexican Dia de los Muertos. Today, Day of the Dead has been increasingly popular with Latinos in the United States. Though many of the traditional elements have remained how and where Day of the Dead is celebrated has changed.

Download the  Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead interactive iBook! 

Download the interactive e-Book for the Teacher Toolkit!

Visit our iTunes collection to explore more of our interactive educational resources!

Learn more about the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on the Latino.si.edu website and view more of our cultural and educational resources. Connect with the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on Twitter and Instagram @Smithsonian_LVM and become a part of our growing online community. Follow us on Facebook!

Considering how often I see Day of the Dead represented commercially for the (generally white) masses as some kind of extra-colorful second Halloween, this seems like a doubly great resource to share.

(via smithsonianlibraries)

Filed under education latin@ heritage latin@ resources history social studies

5 notes

I did in fact make a post re: Coming Out Day, as I think several people expect one from me at this point, what with the focus on LGBTQ issues and youth and education popping up consistently.

I wrote it, and rewrote it.  And I abandoned it, because it said nothing new and did nothing different than any of the previous ones you could find on this blog.  And then I took a different tack and got really honest.

And that one’s in my drafts, because I can’t tell if it’s remotely helpful or useful.

So it may pop up later and it may not.  But to all those of you who came out: you’re very brave.  To all those of you who stayed in the “closet,” you’re also very brave.  You’re all very brave for following the choices that keep you safe and happy in a world that often gives you more struggle than support.

(And to those I’ve seen make that effort to learn more so that they can be the best support to their students, their kids, their peers, their friends, because they recognize the need — and who do not expect any thanks, who do it because it’s the right thing to do and more people should — you’re good examples, and good people.)

Filed under lgbtq coming out day education

21 notes

hisnamewasbeanni:

wincherella:

christina-in-alaska:

I’ve been absent from #fashionableteacher.  I promise I’ve been fashionable.  

Me too, my pictures just turn out really bad. 

I’ve been consciously absent, ‘cause I’ve definitely not been fashionable.

Today an infant wiped their leaky nose, drooled on their hand, and then while flailing accidentally stuck that hand in my mouth.

I gave up being consciously fashionable a couple weeks ago.

Filed under though apparently today I did so by accident education fashionableteacher

4,259 notes

Puberty blockers help make trans teens into happier young adults, study finds

gaywrites:

Transgender youth who take puberty-delaying hormone treatments are more likely to be happier when they fully transition, according to a new study.

The study found that starting on hormone replacements around age 14 resulted in better mental health for trans youth, and that they had an easier time transitioning into their lived and true gender identity later on.

“The first thing this study shows is that transgender young people, with appropriate treatment, can function at the same psychological level as the rest of the population,” Jenifer McGuire, co-author of the study, told BuzzFeed News. “They have the same distribution as everyone else when they’re treated properly.”

The Dutch study, which involved 22 transgender men and 33 transgender women, found that because of the early hormone treatment, the participants ultimately had no more emotional distress, anxiety, or issues with body image than their peers in the general population after they had transitioned. They also required less gender reassignment surgery, as physical characteristics that develop during puberty were suppressed.

Studies like this are so, so important because they add another layer of credibility to the work we already know is important. We know one of the ways to help trans youth become their true selves as happily and healthily as possible, and the research clearly shows that we should keep doing it. 

For those who insist that one cannot allow youth to make such “big decisions” about themselves so young — validation that these decisions are valid, healthy, important, and necessary to support.

When a youth tells you they are trans and you tell them that they’re too young to make that decision, that they should wait, what you are telling them is, “you should wait until your body continues to develop to a point that you are so truly miserable in what may feel like a prison that no one will then be able to deny that you knew yourself best.” Many, many people seem to feel this way — the youth can’t possibly know themselves well enough to make such a big decision. Adults know better — even when it’s not the adult’s body and mind.

So to see a study backing the proactive decisions that help give power to young peoples’ voices and knowledge about themselves is something great.

(via nouveauqueer)

Filed under education trans youth lgbtq

34 notes

Because I know I’m not the only one who’s been here:

an awkward and necessary honesty moment:

Going from an old position to a new one can be hard, even if it’s for all the right reasons.

It means coming from a place, even if you didn’t realize it, where you were knowledgeable about the work you’d been doing — and ending in a place where even if it’s a familiar field, things may be confusing.

You may feel less capable.

You may feel overwhelmed.

You may feel like less of a whatever-your-job-may-be.

You may be going from feeling competent, maybe even feeling like one of the experts in even one particular thing, to feeling like you just aren’t very good at your job at all.

It’s okay.

You’re learning.  You’re new.  You may be in a new place with new people, and even if you’re doing the same sort of job you may have a whole new crop of kids and families (and even coworkers) who have a whole new set of needs and strengths.

If you’re moving from one position to the next and you’re feeling down on yourself, remember: this is a change.  You’re good at what you do.  You may have felt really good about your work at your last position, but did you go in that way?  You felt good about your work because of all the time you had there, even if it was just a semester for some of you student teachers out there, to get better at it.  And by the time you’ve been at the place you are now that same amount of time, you’ll feel capable with what you’re doing now, too.

You’re learning.  Nobody starts out an expect.  Most people don’t start out spectacular.  In fact, I’d even hazard a guess that for many of us starting something new, we start by feeling like we’re fumbling through and tripping on our own two feet.

But you’ll get there.  Give yourself time.

Filed under education positivity I don't know if you needed this but I needed this learning change self-care mental health

66 notes

Why I love teaching _______________:

itsssnix:

Why do you love teaching the grade level you teach at?

Birth through five: Because they’re literally learning everything.  Last week I got to see a toddler’s face as they realized that putting cups over their ears had a sound to it, and you would have thought they just discovered the meaning of life itself.  Everything is new and exciting to them.

Filed under new experiences for them and for me early childhood eec toddlers education

3,939 notes

everyoneisgay:

Bisexual Awareness Day: An Important New Study by HRC

Today is Bisexual Awareness Day, and HRC released a report along with BiNet USA, Bisexual Resource Center, and the Bisexual Organization Project that is very important in further understanding the stigmatization that many in the bisexual and pansexual community face on a regular basis.

Check out the full report here!

This is an incredibly important conversation to have and continue having until those with any and all sexualities and gender identities are welcomed within and outside of the LGBTQ+ community.

Kristin also weighed in with her own experience on the issue in an article on the same topic released today by Autostraddle.

Check out the Autostraddle article here!

<3<3<3

This is something that I hear over and over again, not only from youth but from adults as well. When bisexual and pansexual youth come out and are told that they’re “faking” or need to “pick one,” that they’re “greedy” or “confused” or “going through a phase,” it invalidates their identity. And then, when they look to the adults in the community — if they can find any mention of bi- or pansexuality, as both are so frequently erased in the media and the streets — and see that little changes for them, that bi- and pansexual adults are still derided, belittled, and erased, what is the message we as adults are sending?

People often ask, “but how can I address these specific issues if I’m not working with youth I know or suspect to be part of the community?” It’s easy: examine your own behavior as adults, toward other adults as well as toward youth. Examine your actions and your attitudes. And if you’re still thinking of bisexuality or pansexuality as “the first stop to gay-town,” just a stepping stone, just experimentation, indecisiveness, or some comment on sexual appetite — stop. Re-evaluate. Think, “if a young person heard what I was thinking or saying right now, how would that affect their development as a person?”

You can change it.

Filed under education sexuality lgbtq social justice bisexuality pansexuality youth

4 notes

Anonymous asked: I have just started my student teaching at an elementary school in the lower grades. Teachers were discussing a student who "thinks they're a boy." I asked what bathroom they use and if the school lets them use the one they feel most comfortable in. One teacher said, "they're a girl so that's the restroom that they use." I have been meaning to ask the school nurse about school policy because I'm curious but I have not had the chance yet. I was curious about advice working with students this age.

Hi there anon,

This is definitely going to be a complicated issue — but it will probably be more complicated for the adults involved than the kids.  How are the kids reacting?  How about the student’s parents? 

Finding out about the school policy is an excellent start.  Be prepared for push-back; trying to act as a student teacher may be difficult.  Do you have an advising/mentor teacher?  A supervisor through your program?  Have you mentioned this to them yet?

There are a number of books out there both for kids at the early elementary grades and for adults that help introduce the idea of trans* issues and gender spectrum and non-conforming youth; it might be a little passive aggressive to just leave a few pieces of reading in the teachers’ lounge, though you could always feign having left it by accident by looking for it later.  

But if the administration is on board and/or you feel comfortable suggesting some informal (or formal, though most schools set those schedules far ahead of time) PD, I would suggest exposing the adults in the school to some important resources for schools regarding working with LGBTQ* issues — including and especially gender — in a way that’s safe and respectful for the students.  There are a number of resources out there aimed at schools but also at the elementary level specifically, which may come as a surprise to many people.  Gender Spectrum and PFLAG are some of my perpetual favorites. If you search “gender spectrum” and “education,” you can also find a number of articles that may outline specific things that you can do as a teacher to encourage acceptance and self-expression in your own classroom.

Please don’t hesitate to offer some more information, ask some more specific questions, or keep us updated.  I’d love to be of more help.

Filed under education gender trans* gender spectrum lgbtq gender orientation Anonymous