Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged family

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It's Official, I'm the Family Tour Guide for the Chicago History Museum

coolchicksfromhistory:

obitoftheday:

So if you live in and around Chicago and have a child in Kindergarten through 6th grade I would be thrilled to welcome you to our first Chicago History Museum Family Tour:

The Great Chicago Fire: A Hot Time in the Old Town

Saturday, April 27, 2013

10:00 a.m. - Noon

$20 adults/$10 kids

Buy tickets online here.

And if you come on the tour (or any of the future tours) let me know you’re a Tumblr and I’ll give your kid an extra piece of Juicy Fruit (which debuted at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition).

And check out the Chicago History Museum Tumblr, too.

Signal boost

Something to pass along to my Chicago folks!

Filed under museum chicago education family family activity chicago history museum

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kicksandgiggles:

positivelypersistentteach:

Sometimes intentionally, and it freaks my parents out that I talk like that to strangers’ kids.

My sister has requested that I bring my teacher voice & face along on her bachelorette weekend in order to keep the other bridesmaids in line. I giggled when she asked. I’m not sure if she knows what she’s asking for. 

I did this to my brother a lot — he liked to rock back on the dining room chairs, and I was working in a first-grade class where “four on the floor” was an important mantra thanks to the tennis balls on the feet of the chair. You rock back on one of those and you end up on the floor.What was worse was when I would walk past and without looking, noting it, or breaking from conversation, tilt the chair to put it back the way it was supposed to be.  While he was still in it.

Then he was too mildly freaked-out to be annoyed.

kicksandgiggles:

positivelypersistentteach:

Sometimes intentionally, and it freaks my parents out that I talk like that to strangers’ kids.

My sister has requested that I bring my teacher voice & face along on her bachelorette weekend in order to keep the other bridesmaids in line. I giggled when she asked. I’m not sure if she knows what she’s asking for. 

I did this to my brother a lot — he liked to rock back on the dining room chairs, and I was working in a first-grade class where “four on the floor” was an important mantra thanks to the tennis balls on the feet of the chair. You rock back on one of those and you end up on the floor.

What was worse was when I would walk past and without looking, noting it, or breaking from conversation, tilt the chair to put it back the way it was supposed to be.  While he was still in it.

Then he was too mildly freaked-out to be annoyed.

(Source: sweep)

Filed under education family

Notes

No, as a matter of fact I’m not technically old enough to have a daughter in college.

I have two daughters — one who calls me Mommy, and one who calls me Daddy.  They are both college-aged women.

I am twenty-four.

So how does that work exactly?

Ball culture (drag) in major US cities involves houses, headed by house mothers or fathers, and are comprised of bands of “children” who drag and compete together under the house mother or father’s mentoring.  When I was in Arkansas, my housemate was “mother” to three different young men, one of whom was actually older than he was.  Rather than based on age it was based on the age at which they came out, or joined the house, or made their way into the “scene.”  They came to him for advice about everything from drag to dating to family problems, called him “mom” or any variation of such they could think of, and even bought him balloons and cards on Mothers’ Day.  He did their hair, he helped them shop for clothes…on a few occasions he brought them in for a night when they had nowhere else to go, and I know he’d made them sit-down-at-the-table-together dinner at least once.

These are families of their own making.  When people don’t have the family they need (whether that family is literally missing, or unsupportive to the point of alienation), sometimes they find it on their own.

Ours is not a drag house, but the concept is the same.

Filed under lgbtq family not quite nuclear

358 notes

The Somewhat Terrible and Depressing Story Of How I Was Sexually Harassed by my Wal-Mart Manager And Was Intimidated Into Doing Nothing About It Then Alienated By My Family For It

eight-for-you-honey:

I think this post has been long in coming.  I tell bits of it at a time, but instead of recounting it over and over again to people wanting to know, I will probably just use this to reference them to it so they will know without me having to recall every detail.

So, this started when I was around twenty years old.  I had just lost a job at a bakery and really needed to get a job quickly so I could continue to pay for my college education without getting loans.  I applied for Wal-Mart and got a pretty quick call back.  I went in for the interview a week after applying.

The manager who interviewed me — we’ll call him Matt — seemed to really take to me.  I assumed it was because of my natural charm, charisma and intelligence.  I was to be quickly disillusioned the rest of my natural life, but particularly in this case.

Read More

Again, not education-related, but something many of you who are health - or social justice-minded might want to read.  Walmart has a very bad track record for their treatment of women, and suffering at work is hard enough without also suffering consequences at home.

(Source: anightvaleintern)

Filed under sexual harassment walmart family support

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Sitting down and looking at options that work with youth, but may not necessarily be traditional teaching positions.

Finding a lot of potentially great intervention, mentoring, and out-of-school education work.

Just got into a shouting match with my mother over the possibility of working in St. Louis (a place which, even after a year of living in a NLR ghetto, I did not have particularly good things to say for after a visit that left me without my wallet).  I might have been yelling too, but when you tell me that if I’m going to work with kids in a war zone I should work in Rwanda and not here, because here they’re neglected by the government and left to themselves but there they’ve seen real violence…why are we ranking their suffering?  And why does that mean that kids here don’t deserve help? 

Have been accused of being insane for looking at some of these positions. 

I think I’m ok with that.  And I guess I better get used to it, since everything so far is either D.C., the Bronx, or St. Louis.

Filed under education jobs job-searching teaching alternatives family

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Guest Post: In Which My Brother Is Articulate, Goofy, and Adorable, but Maybe I am Biased

I’ll be posting my own recommendations shortly, but the highlight of the night is my brother — English major and Supreme Court groupie — and his general suggestions to teachers everywhere, written from personal experience and a geekish love for law.

EDIT: Fixed all that bizarre jibberish.  Wasn’t there when I first posted.

                May it please the Court.

I have a dream. I dream that in every school in America there are law classes and that in every child’s backpack a law book discoursing each Supreme Court case’s issues and arguments. As I said, I have a dream. More realistically, I’d like to just see the issues facing the highest court in the land and, arguably, the most powerful governmental institution, understood by our youngest generations; Names like Warren and Rehnquist and, I daresay, Taney should be stamped on the children’s tongues like the mythical men of the Constitution.

                Never before has any attempt been made to introduce Supreme Court rulings before high school, and, specifically in my case, senior year. I’m not writing to upset the normalcy of education that includes the basic history, math, science and English. I am not a rebel, or an entrepreneur of thought. My purpose in writing this is to promote Courts, Kids, and the Constitution to educate youth not only on the importance of the Supreme Court in American life, but to teach debate and philosophy.

                To make a, truly, appreciative use of Courts, Kids, and the Constitution it should be said that your kids should be first taught the Bill of Rights, at the very least.  

                The format of Peter Irons’ book is perfect for teaching basic discussion and philosophy skills; Cases are divided into three sections: The issues, the transcript, and the decision. To promote conversation, it is recommended that after the issues are explained you stop the tape (assuming you are using the tape) and let each and everyone express their opinions on the issues, either verbally, or through writing. It should be said that, while more difficult to maintain, conversation is suggested over writing because it promotes peaceful discussion (hopefully) and the free exchange of ideas, tenets basic to living in the United States. After conversation has ended, inquire as to what the kids think each side will say to argue their case. This is assuming that the class you teach has knowledge of the Bill of Rights. If not, the transcript is probably better off skipped. In either case, ask the kids what they believe will be the outcome after the transcripts.

                Of course, not every teacher has use of that ancient tech known “cassette players,” which will surely get you laughed at by your high tech students. Don’t fear though, for if you fear this sort of thing, or you just don’t happen to have a cassette player, you can easily teach about the cases (as teachers you obviously know this). You can act as the narrator and have different students act out different people in the case. As I never found this teaching method ineffective, being the one wishing I could leave every time someone embarrassingly overacted, or under acted, I should alternatively suggest a mock Supreme Court. You can act as the Chief Justice and set up each lawyer and Justice to your liking. This can be complicated to enact and easily can fall flat, so be wary.

                 Hopefully I have inspired a hundred teachers to create a hundred new curriculums involving court cases. Realistically I have made a hundred teachers think about court cases and maybe teaching it. All know certainly is, that from personal experience a class can’t debate the morality of algebra, or the outcome of chemical reaction, and even themes in literature is questionable for debate because of the necessity for evidence. Simply put, court cases allow us to express opinions on matters that affect our lives every day, and our youngest generation need more than fact shoveled into their heads.  

                I rest my case.        

As for the professionalism of my title, the entirety of the body of the email he attached his text in read “Butterscotch Puppycakes,” so I don’t feel like I’m shortchanging anyone.

Filed under books curriculum debate education family guest post high school history law may it please the court middle school readers' theater social studies supreme court upper elementary teaching idea