Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged lgbtq

6 notes

ussrosalind:

 sirken said: Speaking of R + J, what are the odds of a return for Queer Side Story? :D?

Well, good Sir, I have no idea what the odds are. Mostly, I still find it very hard to watch the tapes to write down even a loose script. This is partially because “Ahhh I don’t want to see high school me” and partially because it is on tapes and the only VHS player I have only works about 5% of the time. 

At this point I would LOVE to do it again, absolutely love to, but I would pretty much only agree to do it if we could just start over entirely. It was a great little show the first time we did it, but it was also a show done in improv by about 20 different teens. I also feel like I would need the permission from the majority of the original casties, some of whom are very protective over the story and are reluctant to give up their characters to someone else. (Or so it was last I checked.) 

Still, I DO love the show. I DO have a terrible obsession with EVERY version of “Romeo and Juliet” and the one I envisioned, got funded for, and directed that stood a tiny area in Western Massachusetts on its ear? I love it more than others. It was a great experience to see people really grasp for the first time that by either denying the existence of or vilifying another person’s love you are only asking for tragedy. It goes for any kind of love, I think, and that’s why the story of R&J is such a beautiful template. It got people talking about racism in “West Side Story” and in my show it got people really thinking about homophobia. (Not just bragging, there is proof! We had a guest book and a lot of our guests were really, really emotional about it and wrote us amazing messages. I think a guest book would be REQUIRED if anyone were to do the show again. Give people a place to talk about their experience and they WILL use it and it will give you a great idea of how powerful the play is.)  (It’s like a tumblr for people who don’t use tumblr.) 

So yeah, no crystal ball here, but if the stars align to preform this play about two ladies who are star-crossed lovers once more… I would be happy to help. 

Also, if you have no idea what Sir Ken and I are talking about, here’s one of the few articles about the original show that is still on the internet:

http://shakespearemag.blogspot.com/2004/08/gay-shakespeare-roils-town-shelburne.html

It’s possibly the coolest thing I have ever done and I am still coming to terms with that and trying to come up with more different things to do that can at least be equally, if not more amazing. 

P.S. Regarding our “transgender villain’ — those are their words, not ours. Tybalt in any version of R&J is angry, confused, and misguided. Here Ze happened to be a perfect example of interlocking forms of oppression. I would never call Tybalt a villain, ever.  

Reblogging on the #education side because there is so much good stuff here (R+J commentary, youth empowerment, intersectionality) that I don’t even know where to start.

I almost bolded the PS, but there was so much here I also could have bolded — AND, if she gets permission from the person who originally played Tybalt, she’s going to do a further writeup specifically about that character, which I’m looking forward to very, very much.

Filed under shakespeare romeo and juliet ussrosalind education lgbtq

28 notes

katy-mylady:

Oh how I wish I could show this in my religion class and not fear for my job.

There’s something especially important to me, in this video.

Yes, they get married.  That’s a blip in this, an important one as the artist says — “a certificate on paper isn’t gonna solve it all but it’s a damn good place to start.”

It’s a damn good place to START.  It isn’t going to solve it all — it means that we need to look at the all.

Look at what else is represented in this.  Look at what they go through to get there:

A little boy justifying himself as not being gay because he still does things a man is supposed to be good at.

A teen out of place during slow dances at prom, wandering around by himself and hiding in the bathroom.

A couple being jostled on the street for holding hands.

A young man sitting at the table while his parents get up and leave.

By the time the wedding hits, the mother is back, but that doesn’t happen for all LGBTQ youth.  When they bump shoulders with the other man on the street it’s just a hostile motion, but for many other LGBTQ youth that isn’t where it stops.  Not all LGBTQ youth make it to that house, to that wedding, to that old age.  Not all of them make it through the games of spin-the-bottle with their hearts in tact.

I wish anyone could show this to any of their students.  I’m sorry that people can’t.  I’m sorry that someone was already punished for trying to do so.  I’m sorry that for all these reasons there are still students — and teachers, and parents, and other adults — who still have to hide who they are from so many people.

But if you can, show this to someone, if you haven’t already.  Even if you can show it to one student, teacher, friend, classmate, anybody, you don’t know where it will go from there and you don’t know who it might be reaching.

And for those of you out there watching this and feeling like it fits and doesn’t fit, not every person gets married, or comes out, or holds hands on the street, or isn’t accepted or is accepted.  Not everyone wants the same things.  No one is the same.  There is no one trajectory to life.  You don’t HAVE to choose to do the things other people before you do.  Not everyone is the same kind of person even when they identify the same way.  You have to do what’s best, what’s happiest, for YOU. 

"Live on," this song says, "and be yourself."   And if you can, do what you can, to be sure that everyone has that right.

Filed under education lgbtq someone is cutting onions I'd say I want a redo on prom but I don't actually have a woman to go with so it's a bit moot Instead of a wedding one day I'll just have a big happier prom

18 notes

jekoh:

All this talk of being dapper made me realize that I never actually finished this poster, which I’d really loved and we never finished as part of a package that never got off the ground, as far as I’m aware.  (I graduated.) 
The whole idea was that we’d built ourselves a family — our most popular events were our LGBTQ-themed monthly movie nights, which we always kicked off with a family-style dinner and went around the table asking how everyone’s day had went while we passed around the food — and invited everyone to join.
So tonight I dropped in the photos, blacked out what I needed, and voila.
IF you want to use this, please let me know, because my college group logo is still down there and all.  I’d rather turn this into a template for you than just pass it along as-is.  And if you DO want to do an informational campaign like this and you have someone willing, it would probably be more impactful to have someone from YOUR group in the photos.  I only blacked out part of my face because it’s the internet, but in the original it was making me a very visible representative of the group. 

 (The pictures, c’est moi.)

jekoh:

All this talk of being dapper made me realize that I never actually finished this poster, which I’d really loved and we never finished as part of a package that never got off the ground, as far as I’m aware.  (I graduated.) 

The whole idea was that we’d built ourselves a family — our most popular events were our LGBTQ-themed monthly movie nights, which we always kicked off with a family-style dinner and went around the table asking how everyone’s day had went while we passed around the food — and invited everyone to join.

So tonight I dropped in the photos, blacked out what I needed, and voila.

IF you want to use this, please let me know, because my college group logo is still down there and all.  I’d rather turn this into a template for you than just pass it along as-is.  And if you DO want to do an informational campaign like this and you have someone willing, it would probably be more impactful to have someone from YOUR group in the photos.  I only blacked out part of my face because it’s the internet, but in the original it was making me a very visible representative of the group. 

 (The pictures, c’est moi.)

Filed under lgbtq education gender

134,598 notes

jekoh:

hisnamewasbeanni:

gqgqqt:

so this is a thing

a bunch of moms are making letters+audio recordings of affirming, validating letters to queer/trans* people who don’t get that kind of support from their moms

i would say more about it but

im kind of busy in this puddle of tears on the floor so

Sometimes the family you make is the family that carries you through.  This is wonderful.

And if anyone following this blog needs family for support, you have me and mine.

Filed under lgbtq realities people should just generally be aware of

80,622 notes

juicythought:

Shouldn’t this conversation be an integral part of sex-ed? Yeah I think so… Stop being so scared of your own students teachers!

Things have come a long way in some places; I know that when I was in high school health class (that was only about 8 years ago) our health teacher told us that our school district prohibited him from talking about homosexuality.  Needless to say, it made for a slightly uncomfortable semester for me when we actually got to the sex ed.  And this wasn’t where you’d think; this was downstate NY.

(via hydroxylradicals-deactivated201)

Filed under education lgbtq sex ed

80,622 notes

ace-reporter:

savingprivatebullshit:

altogether-ooky-avaedgeworth:

theburningpile:

Beyond this being really cool, I just gotta say…

HOLY SHIT STAPLES DID SOMETHING THAT POSITIVELY AFFECTS THE UNIVERSE?!?

STAPLES OF ALL THE COMPANIES

“If they haven’t told you yet, they don’t want you to know. Let them tell you.”

Wait, Staples is showing that they care about something? That’s unusual. Staples has an intense culture of corporate apathy.

Just in case anyone may read it the wrong way (it’s happened before), number five on the “5 Things to Know About Your Queer Child” has a lot to do with the way that queer youth are perceived and treated.

Otherwise, it’s a great set of posters.  The wording on Two-Spirit specifies that it applies in specific ethnic and cultural contexts, and the set includes a poster on monosexism/biphobia, which seems to be rarely addressed.

I’ve been asked a few times by people working with youth in whatever capacity about how they can help actively fight against some of these issues, and the bottom set of posters offers some great recommendations.

(via transgenderstudentlife)

Filed under education lgbtq

3 notes

GIVEAWAY: The easiest and most difficult place to start when cleaning out an apartment is the bookshelves — and I found something for you.

I seem to have two copies of One Teacher in Ten, Second Edition: LGBT Educators Share Their Stories.

There’s no reason for me to have two of these.  I’d like to give one away.

So how do I go about doing that?  I’ve seen people here do contests and things, but I don’t know that I’m a good instigator in that sort of thing.  What I do notice when I see posts related to LGBTQ educators, however, is that it’s important for people to know that they’re not alone.

So how about this: if you’re interested in the book, reblog this with a) why you’d like the book and b) a favorite story about your students or kids you’ve worked with.  Does that last part have to be related?  No.  Oh, and say a little something about yourself — what you teach or how you work with kids or what you’re studying, etc.

LGBTQ teachers should be able to share stories about the way their identities intersect — but they should also be able to share stories about their teacher identity without their sexuality coming into play.  It’s important, to me at least, to have that balance: “I have these very specific experiences that are unique to my personal identity,” as well as “I have many experiences that are common among all teachers.”

So…let’s hear it.  I’ll find some other stuff to put in too, because I feel a bit cheesy only doing this for one book.

EDIT: If there are teachers out there who keep their personal and professional identity strictly separate and don’t want to out themselves on their teaching blog, PLEASE feel free to reblog this on your personal blogs instead, or to note or fanmail me with a request to keep your anonymity (I’d like to compile and post these later).  No one should have to make themselves uncomfortable, and I won’t be checking your tumblr to be sure you’re education-related, that doesn’t matter.  I trust you. 

Filed under education lgbtq one teacher in ten giveaway

34 notes

All I have to say:

wyveraryborealis:

Conversations like this (about teachers personalizing classrooms and being allowed to share their interests and talk about their families) never fail to make me think about stories like this (regarding whether queer people are allowed to be “out” at work, especially in certain professions; you can easily imagine a similar story from a teacher’s perspective).

Being able to talk about your family at work is a privilege. We cannot have this conversation without having that conversation.

Thank you. This is hard to get across so succinctly.

(via girlwithalessonplan)

Filed under education lgbtq

17 notes

"Judge the sandwich by the sandwich": Chick-fil-A, the Greek Olympian and the sandwich problem

jekoh:

positivelypersistentteach:

libbsmcg:

Everyone please read this.

Sorry I’m not sorry, but I want a restaurant that doesn’t donate to bigotry in legislation.

I don’t expect everyone to agree with me, but I’m not going to give my money to a company that gives some of their profit to such endeavors.   I’m also not going to cheer on an athlete that makes racist comments, just like I won’t support an athlete that condones (or commits) violence against women.

Considering the history of the Olympics, and the hostages murdered, I stand by Greece for kicking her off the team.  Hopefully she’ll learn a lesson more valuable than winning an Olympic medal.  Hopefully it will make people think.  Hopefully it will prevent other people from making the same mistake.  But above all, this move says, “We as a country don’t condone this,” and I think that’s awesome. 

Here’s the thing.

If it was just some guy serving me a sandwich, and I was handing him money so he could eat and put a roof over his head, maybe that’s one thing.

But if I’m giving him money and part of that money is going to people who are promoting something that I find morally reprehensible, guess what?

It isn’t about the sandwich anymore.

What your money goes to matters.

In fact, in a capitalist country like the U.S., where your views are sometimes only as heard as your money can make them loud, where your money goes matters a lot.  Yes, we live in a democracy.  But our democracy is not only run by our voices, it’s run by our money.  Our money speaks for us. 

If it was just Joe Somebody on the corner selling me a sandwich, if he was selling it to me along with a mouthful of ideology like Chik-Fil-A’s, my appetite would probably be ruined anyway.

But when your money speaks for you, and the money you fork over for that sandwich is saying “I support what this company is spouting,” it’s not just a sandwich anymore.  And if you don’t understand why what we do with our money is important, I suggest you Google “boycott” and “Montgomery bus”…or “Delano grapes”…or, um, “Boston” and “tea.”  Sit in on a basic civics class.  Something.

Is boycotting Chik-Fil-A the same scope?  Probably not, but you never know how something will spread.

And if your craving for a particular sandwich is more important than my rights as a human being, well, let me step off my more civil soap box and tell you how I really feel.

Filed under civics social studies boycott chik-fil-a lgbtq