Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged lgbtq

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Last month was Pride, and I didn’t do much for it. So, I owe you guys some.

It took me a surprisingly long time to process the DOMA decision, in part because I wanted to remind myself that it was only one step of a large process and didn’t address a lot of the more immediate needs of the LGBTQ community, but also because…it honestly seemed almost too good to be true, it was so big and so impactful in a lot of ways itself.

But since that was an unfortunate oversight when I’m usually a big advocate and voice for these things, I’m keeping an open ask-box not only for the usual school-related issues, but additionally and especially for anything LGBTQ-related, whether it’s educational or general advice, from students or teachers or anybody.  This includes personal questions about myself, a gender-wonky lesbian youth-worker/teacher-turned-mental-health-clinician and aspiring counselor/therapist.  I’ve even turned on anonymous, which is a little anxiety-inducing, but we’ll call it a grand experiment.

Because of the holiday in the US, I’ll try leaving anon open for…about a week, and we’ll see how it goes.  Answers will include references or helpful resources as needed.  Feel free to reblog if you know someone who might have an ask!

I’ll also consider answering (additionally) with video if it’s requested and/or if I get some good batches.

Filed under education lgbtq LGBTQ teachers LGBTQ students gay lesbian

1,085 notes

jekoh:

pewresearch:

Same-sex marriage (top) and acceptance of homosexuality (bottom) around the world.

I know that this is likely a comparison for the sake of this specific comparison, and that some things are far easier to put into measurable data than others, or at least remotely accurate or reliable data.

But I want to point something out here.

In these images we’re looking at acceptance as measured by survey and marriage.  Not evictions.  Not physical violence.  Not deaths.  Granted these things are, as I mentioned, far less easy or certain to measure in some respect, since if someone lives in a place where people believe homosexuality should be punished by death there may not exactly be anyone counting how many people are beaten or murdered for that exact reason.

But we’re perpetuating that the only way to look at acceptance of homosexuality, or at least the best way to do so, is marriage.  And so we’re helping to create a population of people who may believe that marriage is the most important issue facing LGBTQ populations, as opposed to basic safety — and, in fact, that we’re beyond needing to worry about issues of basic safety.  My own friends and family have on occasion expressed shock and disbelief that we might still have to worry about being fired or evicted or abused because of who we are.  Because it’s all about marriage, right?  We’re there!

We’re not there yet.  We’re closer.  We’re better than we were in some places and in some respects.  But do not let these images, this focus, these statistics, make you think that everything is fine and that our biggest issue is marriage.  It’s not.

Thought this might also be relevant to the education side -

because there are teachers still afraid being themselves will destroy their careers and students still afraid being themselves will destroy their school years

and for discussion in classes lucky or daring enough to have those discussions.

(I’ve been in two of the three of these groups, and it’s not the ones I’d have wanted at the time.)

Filed under lgbtq education

30 notes

Satisfactori: Are you a trans*, gender nonconforming, or nonbinary TEACHER?

teamteachers:

satisfactori:


I recently decided to be a teacher, but I also identify as agender. I was wondering if you could help me out by answering a few questions. These include:
How do you identify yourself?
ex. genderqueer, femme, avid reader, left handed, tall, tough, sparkly, gender creative, gay, fun,…

Click through for the rest.

Boosting.

These are some great questions.  If folks like me follow folks like me, go on and give it a click through.  And if you aren’t in this category, click through and read anyway, to get an idea of all the extras we have to think about on the daily.

And in general…let’s be there for each other.  Because for some people this might be a non-issue, while for others it might make the experience more difficult.

(Source: excitatori)

Filed under education lgbtq

2,875 notes

Tennessee "Don’t Say Gay" bill now requires teachers to inform parents if their child is gay

positivelypersistentteach:

fivecentwisdom:

think-progress:

They’ve found a way to make a horrible idea even worse.

Well. This is terrible.

This breaks all boundaries.

There is so little and so much to say about something like this all at once, and I’m saddened and stunned and incredibly concerned.

Those of us who don’t live in Tennessee can hope this dies a quick death.  Those who do: Call.  Your.  Lawmakers.


And now that I think about it, I was lying; those of us who don’t live in Tennessee CAN do something about this politically (aside from educating ourselves to be sure that we never fall prey to terrible ideas like any of these):  we can still call all of our elected officials and ask them, "Is ____ familiar with the ‘Don’t Say Gay’ bill, SB 234, in Tennessee? I just wanted to call and let ____’s office know that if he/she/they were ever to draft or support a similar measure in my state, I would never be voting for them again."


Make your voice heard.  Flood the phones.

And just to reiterate how out of touch Senator Campfield is about any of these issues, he also thinks that, “bullying thing is the biggest lark out there,” in regards to LGBTQ teen suicide, and claims that it is, “virtually, not completely, but virtually impossible to contract AIDS through heterosexual sex.”

This is what happens when we put bigots in office, everyone.  Forgot being knowledgeable or looking at facts and statistics (or, in the case of AIDS, even the most basic information - this is why real sex education is important) — some people can rely on old-fashioned hate to make any claims they want.  And the most frightening thing is, people believe them.

Filed under education lgbtq don't say gay call your politicians tennessee

6 notes

ussrosalind:

 sirken said: Speaking of R + J, what are the odds of a return for Queer Side Story? :D?

Well, good Sir, I have no idea what the odds are. Mostly, I still find it very hard to watch the tapes to write down even a loose script. This is partially because “Ahhh I don’t want to see high school me” and partially because it is on tapes and the only VHS player I have only works about 5% of the time. 

At this point I would LOVE to do it again, absolutely love to, but I would pretty much only agree to do it if we could just start over entirely. It was a great little show the first time we did it, but it was also a show done in improv by about 20 different teens. I also feel like I would need the permission from the majority of the original casties, some of whom are very protective over the story and are reluctant to give up their characters to someone else. (Or so it was last I checked.) 

Still, I DO love the show. I DO have a terrible obsession with EVERY version of “Romeo and Juliet” and the one I envisioned, got funded for, and directed that stood a tiny area in Western Massachusetts on its ear? I love it more than others. It was a great experience to see people really grasp for the first time that by either denying the existence of or vilifying another person’s love you are only asking for tragedy. It goes for any kind of love, I think, and that’s why the story of R&J is such a beautiful template. It got people talking about racism in “West Side Story” and in my show it got people really thinking about homophobia. (Not just bragging, there is proof! We had a guest book and a lot of our guests were really, really emotional about it and wrote us amazing messages. I think a guest book would be REQUIRED if anyone were to do the show again. Give people a place to talk about their experience and they WILL use it and it will give you a great idea of how powerful the play is.)  (It’s like a tumblr for people who don’t use tumblr.) 

So yeah, no crystal ball here, but if the stars align to preform this play about two ladies who are star-crossed lovers once more… I would be happy to help. 

Also, if you have no idea what Sir Ken and I are talking about, here’s one of the few articles about the original show that is still on the internet:

http://shakespearemag.blogspot.com/2004/08/gay-shakespeare-roils-town-shelburne.html

It’s possibly the coolest thing I have ever done and I am still coming to terms with that and trying to come up with more different things to do that can at least be equally, if not more amazing. 

P.S. Regarding our “transgender villain’ — those are their words, not ours. Tybalt in any version of R&J is angry, confused, and misguided. Here Ze happened to be a perfect example of interlocking forms of oppression. I would never call Tybalt a villain, ever.  

Reblogging on the #education side because there is so much good stuff here (R+J commentary, youth empowerment, intersectionality) that I don’t even know where to start.

I almost bolded the PS, but there was so much here I also could have bolded — AND, if she gets permission from the person who originally played Tybalt, she’s going to do a further writeup specifically about that character, which I’m looking forward to very, very much.

Filed under shakespeare romeo and juliet ussrosalind education lgbtq

28 notes

katy-mylady:

Oh how I wish I could show this in my religion class and not fear for my job.

There’s something especially important to me, in this video.

Yes, they get married.  That’s a blip in this, an important one as the artist says — “a certificate on paper isn’t gonna solve it all but it’s a damn good place to start.”

It’s a damn good place to START.  It isn’t going to solve it all — it means that we need to look at the all.

Look at what else is represented in this.  Look at what they go through to get there:

A little boy justifying himself as not being gay because he still does things a man is supposed to be good at.

A teen out of place during slow dances at prom, wandering around by himself and hiding in the bathroom.

A couple being jostled on the street for holding hands.

A young man sitting at the table while his parents get up and leave.

By the time the wedding hits, the mother is back, but that doesn’t happen for all LGBTQ youth.  When they bump shoulders with the other man on the street it’s just a hostile motion, but for many other LGBTQ youth that isn’t where it stops.  Not all LGBTQ youth make it to that house, to that wedding, to that old age.  Not all of them make it through the games of spin-the-bottle with their hearts in tact.

I wish anyone could show this to any of their students.  I’m sorry that people can’t.  I’m sorry that someone was already punished for trying to do so.  I’m sorry that for all these reasons there are still students — and teachers, and parents, and other adults — who still have to hide who they are from so many people.

But if you can, show this to someone, if you haven’t already.  Even if you can show it to one student, teacher, friend, classmate, anybody, you don’t know where it will go from there and you don’t know who it might be reaching.

And for those of you out there watching this and feeling like it fits and doesn’t fit, not every person gets married, or comes out, or holds hands on the street, or isn’t accepted or is accepted.  Not everyone wants the same things.  No one is the same.  There is no one trajectory to life.  You don’t HAVE to choose to do the things other people before you do.  Not everyone is the same kind of person even when they identify the same way.  You have to do what’s best, what’s happiest, for YOU. 

"Live on," this song says, "and be yourself."   And if you can, do what you can, to be sure that everyone has that right.

Filed under education lgbtq someone is cutting onions I'd say I want a redo on prom but I don't actually have a woman to go with so it's a bit moot Instead of a wedding one day I'll just have a big happier prom

18 notes

jekoh:

All this talk of being dapper made me realize that I never actually finished this poster, which I’d really loved and we never finished as part of a package that never got off the ground, as far as I’m aware.  (I graduated.) 
The whole idea was that we’d built ourselves a family — our most popular events were our LGBTQ-themed monthly movie nights, which we always kicked off with a family-style dinner and went around the table asking how everyone’s day had went while we passed around the food — and invited everyone to join.
So tonight I dropped in the photos, blacked out what I needed, and voila.
IF you want to use this, please let me know, because my college group logo is still down there and all.  I’d rather turn this into a template for you than just pass it along as-is.  And if you DO want to do an informational campaign like this and you have someone willing, it would probably be more impactful to have someone from YOUR group in the photos.  I only blacked out part of my face because it’s the internet, but in the original it was making me a very visible representative of the group. 

 (The pictures, c’est moi.)

jekoh:

All this talk of being dapper made me realize that I never actually finished this poster, which I’d really loved and we never finished as part of a package that never got off the ground, as far as I’m aware.  (I graduated.) 

The whole idea was that we’d built ourselves a family — our most popular events were our LGBTQ-themed monthly movie nights, which we always kicked off with a family-style dinner and went around the table asking how everyone’s day had went while we passed around the food — and invited everyone to join.

So tonight I dropped in the photos, blacked out what I needed, and voila.

IF you want to use this, please let me know, because my college group logo is still down there and all.  I’d rather turn this into a template for you than just pass it along as-is.  And if you DO want to do an informational campaign like this and you have someone willing, it would probably be more impactful to have someone from YOUR group in the photos.  I only blacked out part of my face because it’s the internet, but in the original it was making me a very visible representative of the group. 

 (The pictures, c’est moi.)

Filed under lgbtq education gender

145,392 notes

jekoh:

hisnamewasbeanni:

gqgqqt:

so this is a thing

a bunch of moms are making letters+audio recordings of affirming, validating letters to queer/trans* people who don’t get that kind of support from their moms

i would say more about it but

im kind of busy in this puddle of tears on the floor so

Sometimes the family you make is the family that carries you through.  This is wonderful.

And if anyone following this blog needs family for support, you have me and mine.

Filed under lgbtq realities people should just generally be aware of

89,291 notes

juicythought:

Shouldn’t this conversation be an integral part of sex-ed? Yeah I think so… Stop being so scared of your own students teachers!

Things have come a long way in some places; I know that when I was in high school health class (that was only about 8 years ago) our health teacher told us that our school district prohibited him from talking about homosexuality.  Needless to say, it made for a slightly uncomfortable semester for me when we actually got to the sex ed.  And this wasn’t where you’d think; this was downstate NY.

(via hydroxylradicals-deactivated201)

Filed under education lgbtq sex ed

89,291 notes

ace-reporter:

savingprivatebullshit:

altogether-ooky-avaedgeworth:

theburningpile:

Beyond this being really cool, I just gotta say…

HOLY SHIT STAPLES DID SOMETHING THAT POSITIVELY AFFECTS THE UNIVERSE?!?

STAPLES OF ALL THE COMPANIES

“If they haven’t told you yet, they don’t want you to know. Let them tell you.”

Wait, Staples is showing that they care about something? That’s unusual. Staples has an intense culture of corporate apathy.

Just in case anyone may read it the wrong way (it’s happened before), number five on the “5 Things to Know About Your Queer Child” has a lot to do with the way that queer youth are perceived and treated.

Otherwise, it’s a great set of posters.  The wording on Two-Spirit specifies that it applies in specific ethnic and cultural contexts, and the set includes a poster on monosexism/biphobia, which seems to be rarely addressed.

I’ve been asked a few times by people working with youth in whatever capacity about how they can help actively fight against some of these issues, and the bottom set of posters offers some great recommendations.

(via transgenderstudentlife)

Filed under education lgbtq