Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged math

831 notes

npr:

Math class made delicious: Learn about cones through scones
Math + pastries = ? Cooks use math to make beautiful food all the time: Slicing eight perfect pieces of pie or doubling a recipe requires basic knowledge of fractions, for example.
But how many cooks think about using beautiful food to illustrate the math itself?
Lenore M. Edman and Windell H. Oskay of the blog Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories do. Feast your eyes on their latest work, “sconic sections,” pictured above.
Read more at NPR’s The Salt.
(Photo courtesy of Lenore M. Edman)

npr:

Math class made delicious: Learn about cones through scones

Math + pastries = ? Cooks use math to make beautiful food all the time: Slicing eight perfect pieces of pie or doubling a recipe requires basic knowledge of fractions, for example.

But how many cooks think about using beautiful food to illustrate the math itself?

Lenore M. Edman and Windell H. Oskay of the blog Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories do. Feast your eyes on their latest work, “sconic sections,” pictured above.

Read more at NPR’s The Salt.

(Photo courtesy of Lenore M. Edman)

Filed under math education delicious delicious math hisnamewasbeanni

34 notes

hisnamewasbeanni:

fuckyeahmiddleschool:

Fun with space and oreos.

I wonder if I could justify this sort of activity in a fractions lesson instead? I’ve never had to teach the phases of the moon, but I’d REALLY like to do an Oreo lesson one day…(Or would it be wrong to shoehorn it into a curriculum like that? ;) )

Whoah, this is awesome.

I’ve heard a few times that circles can be difficult models for some students when explaining fractions. They may be difficult for some students to segment evenly, and can’t be used for demonstrating multiplication of fractions with overlays the way rectangles can.

Better use chocolate bars.

(If we’re going to be having the kids eat chocolate anything for the sake of learning — I’ve actually never been allowed to use sweets in class — we might as well go all the way!)

…though you could totally use Oreos for set-based fractions, similar to the way they’d use counters/chips (two thirds with the top half and one third with the filling exposed, etc.).  Could be an awesome opportunity for demonstration of understanding of numerator and denominator if you give different students different fractions to model, could be differentiated to include basic addition of fractions for students at the next level and worked step-by-step for students still working on the basic concepts…

Man, better make sure we pair all this delicious math with some health/nutrition lessons.

hisnamewasbeanni:

fuckyeahmiddleschool:

Fun with space and oreos.

I wonder if I could justify this sort of activity in a fractions lesson instead?
I’ve never had to teach the phases of the moon, but I’d REALLY like to do an Oreo lesson one day…
(Or would it be wrong to shoehorn it into a curriculum like that? ;) )

Whoah, this is awesome.

I’ve heard a few times that circles can be difficult models for some students when explaining fractions. They may be difficult for some students to segment evenly, and can’t be used for demonstrating multiplication of fractions with overlays the way rectangles can.

Better use chocolate bars.

(If we’re going to be having the kids eat chocolate anything for the sake of learning — I’ve actually never been allowed to use sweets in class — we might as well go all the way!)

…though you could totally use Oreos for set-based fractions, similar to the way they’d use counters/chips (two thirds with the top half and one third with the filling exposed, etc.).  Could be an awesome opportunity for demonstration of understanding of numerator and denominator if you give different students different fractions to model, could be differentiated to include basic addition of fractions for students at the next level and worked step-by-step for students still working on the basic concepts…

Man, better make sure we pair all this delicious math with some health/nutrition lessons.

Filed under education math maths now I want chocolate such a good role model oreos

13 notes

TDD: What are the essentials that you would recommend for a first-year teach to make sure she has at the beginning of the school year?

adventuresofame:

Specifically, a middle school math teacher, but you know. Anyone in general works, as well. :P

Support materials — workbooks, websites, manipulatives, plans — and knowledge from two years behind and two years ahead of the grade you’re teaching.  When I was working with middle schoolers on math, so many students either needed additional scaffolding or wanted to understand a concept in a way that touched on more advanced material!

And manipulatives can be so helpful at the middle school level.  I’m not sure why they’re not more common, at least around here.

We also had “rentable” flashcard packs — many of our students didn’t have their times tables down, or division, and it made more complex problems far more difficult.

(via turningtohim-deactivated2013121)

Filed under education math tdd teacher dare day

2,055 notes

npr:

cyberlabe:

Infographic Principles Explained By Lego

Stepping on “Data” barefoot in the middle of the night is NO JOKE.—Daisy 

I wonder if the fact that the arranged set isn’t in the same order as the presented visually set would throw some students off — I would imagine arranging it would involve putting it in a particular order.  At least, that’s how I was taught (both in education and psychology). Aside from that (which can be discussed with students anyway), I think this is a stellar concept and could make a potentially great poster for a classroom.

npr:

cyberlabe:

Infographic Principles Explained By Lego

Stepping on “Data” barefoot in the middle of the night is NO JOKE.
—Daisy 

I wonder if the fact that the arranged set isn’t in the same order as the presented visually set would throw some students off — I would imagine arranging it would involve putting it in a particular order.  At least, that’s how I was taught (both in education and psychology). Aside from that (which can be discussed with students anyway), I think this is a stellar concept and could make a potentially great poster for a classroom.

Filed under education math data infographic

54 notes

Things that Annoy Me

hisnamewasbeanni:

math-girl:

coloursinaflower:

Everytime I see this picture posted, I become angry. Especially when it is tagged #education. Can you imagine something similar being posted by teachers about reading? Why do teachers and adults think it is okay to perpetuate the idea that it’s okay to be bad at math? It’s not. And we need to stop the excuses and become better teachers. If you teach math, and you’re not a good math teacher, get better. Stop making excuses.

I definitely feel the need to reblog this.  Something that has really been bothering me lately is when people (especially professors) say, “I’m just not a math person.”  I hope that when I start teaching math, I am able to convince students that they aren’t “not math people”.  Everyone can get something out of math, especially if it’s taught in a way that makes it accessible to students who don’t necessarily thrive in an environment of computations and procedures.

[Too relevant to queue]

Numeracy, like literacy, is a crucial aspect of every single subject area you could possibly think of. It’s not ok for someone to teach with the philosophy, “I’m not a kid person”, yet just as our jobs require we deal with children constantly (and draw positive outcomes from each and every interaction), every lesson we teach children will be imbued with some aspect of numeracy (assumed, or explicit) that will be necessary to succeed.

Oh, and in a sort-of-side-point-but-not-really: If, as a teacher, you can read and interpret your paycheque; you have mathematical ability. If you can do your groceries, and estimate before reaching the register how much you are likely to owe, and whether you will be able to afford that into your budget, you have mathematical ability. Not only that, but you almost certainly have a greater level of ability (not to mention experience) in these matters than many of your students. If you can impart some of this mathematical expertise, skills and values on to your students, you will be doing them a valuable (and necessary) service for their later lives.

Here’s the thing, additionally:

We know that if we tell our students consistently that they are good at something, they will have more confidence, and thus approach the subject differently than if we tell them they are poor at it.  Positive feedback gives positive results; negative feedback gives negative results.

It’s similar with ourselves. And if someone thinks their students will never KNOW that they feel this way about math just because they never say it aloud, they are kidding themselves.  Their attitude about the subject will permeate the way they approach the subject — their tone, the amount of time and effort with which they approach it, the emphasis they put on the subject’s importance in general for their students.

Filed under education math

19 notes

Find your birthday using maths

hisnamewasbeanni:

askmemathsquestions:

This math trick will determine your birthday. Just follow the steps with a calculator and press equal after each step. Go ahead and try the trick without cheating!

 For a simple, online JavaScript calculator, click on the calculator button.


  1. Add 18 to your birth month
  2. Multiply by 25
  3. Subtract 333
  4. Multiply by 8
  5. Subtract 554
  6. Divide by 2
  7. Add your birth date
  8. Multiply by 5
  9. Add 692
  10. Multiply by 20
  11. Add only the last two digits of your birth year
  12. Subtract 32940 to get your birthday!

The answer’s format is: month/day/year. For example, an answer of 123199 means that you were born on December 31, 1999. If the answer is not right, please select one of the following:
a) You followed the directions incorrectly
b) You lied about your birthday or don’t know your birthday
c) All of the above

Most of this is simple “mathematical hand-waving”. Ultimately, once the additions and subtractions have been cancelled out and the multiplications and divisions have been simplified, the whole thing becomes:

(birth month)x10000 + (birth date)x100 + (birth year)

Oh, sorry. I’m a game-wrecker - did I forget to mention?

I was about to go through and deconstruct it for my own curiosity but Luka did it for me already.

Honestly, the coolest things about these tricks are not that they make math look like magic.  It’s figuring out how they work.  Or, alternatively, it’s asking your students to figure out how they work and watching all the different ways the wheels turn.

Filed under math education mathemagic?