Cathedral Building

Another Teaching Blog

Posts tagged science

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thekidshouldseethis:

Nature often devises surprising solutions for hunting food, warning predators away, and attracting mates, but one of the most magical-looking of these solutions might be bioluminescence, or biochemical light created by a living creature.

In this TED Ed video by Leslie Kenna, watch how creatures like angler fish, deep sea shrimp, railroad worms, and fireflies make and use this glow. And then learn more about how humans might put this biochemical solution to good use in innovative new ways.

How would you use bioluminescence?

A new favorite video I want to share that asks a question that would also be great for EDD?  How convenient!

(Source: scienceisbeauty, via thekidshouldseethis)

Filed under edd science

563 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Bullying by childhood peers leaves a trace that can change the expression of a gene linked to mood
A recent study by a researcher at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress (CSHS) at the Hôpital Louis-H. Lafontaine and professor at the Université de Montréal suggests that bullying by peers changes the structure surrounding a gene involved in regulating mood, making victims more vulnerable to mental health problems as they age. The study published in the journal Psychological Medicine seeks to better understand the mechanisms that explain how difficult experiences disrupt our response to stressful situations. “Many people think that our genes are immutable; however this study suggests that environment, even the social environment, can affect their functioning. This is particularly the case for victimization experiences in childhood, which change not only our stress response but also the functioning of genes involved in mood regulation,” says Isabelle Ouellet-Morin, lead author of the study.
A previous study by Ouellet-Morin, conducted at the Institute of Psychiatry in London (UK), showed that bullied children secrete less cortisol—the stress hormone—but had more problems with social interaction and aggressive behaviour. The present study indicates that the reduction of cortisol, which occurs around the age of 12, is preceded two years earlier by a change in the structure surrounding a gene (SERT) that regulates serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in mood regulation and depression.
To achieve these results, 28 pairs of identical twins with a mean age of 10 years were analyzed separately according to their experiences of bullying by peers: one twin had been bullied at school while the other had not. “Since they were identical twins living in the same conditions, changes in the chemical structure surrounding the gene cannot be explained by genetics or family environment. Our results suggest that victimization experiences are the source of these changes,” says Ouellet-Morin. According to the author, it would now be worthwhile to evaluate the possibility of reversing these psychological effects, in particular, through interventions at school and support for victims.
(Image: mentalhealthsupport.co.uk)

neurosciencestuff:

Bullying by childhood peers leaves a trace that can change the expression of a gene linked to mood

A recent study by a researcher at the Centre for Studies on Human Stress (CSHS) at the Hôpital Louis-H. Lafontaine and professor at the Université de Montréal suggests that bullying by peers changes the structure surrounding a gene involved in regulating mood, making victims more vulnerable to mental health problems as they age. The study published in the journal Psychological Medicine seeks to better understand the mechanisms that explain how difficult experiences disrupt our response to stressful situations. “Many people think that our genes are immutable; however this study suggests that environment, even the social environment, can affect their functioning. This is particularly the case for victimization experiences in childhood, which change not only our stress response but also the functioning of genes involved in mood regulation,” says Isabelle Ouellet-Morin, lead author of the study.

A previous study by Ouellet-Morin, conducted at the Institute of Psychiatry in London (UK), showed that bullied children secrete less cortisol—the stress hormone—but had more problems with social interaction and aggressive behaviour. The present study indicates that the reduction of cortisol, which occurs around the age of 12, is preceded two years earlier by a change in the structure surrounding a gene (SERT) that regulates serotonin, a neurotransmitter involved in mood regulation and depression.

To achieve these results, 28 pairs of identical twins with a mean age of 10 years were analyzed separately according to their experiences of bullying by peers: one twin had been bullied at school while the other had not. “Since they were identical twins living in the same conditions, changes in the chemical structure surrounding the gene cannot be explained by genetics or family environment. Our results suggest that victimization experiences are the source of these changes,” says Ouellet-Morin. According to the author, it would now be worthwhile to evaluate the possibility of reversing these psychological effects, in particular, through interventions at school and support for victims.

(Image: mentalhealthsupport.co.uk)

Filed under education science bullying mental health

121 notes

neurosciencestuff:

Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase
“Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so. There hasn’t been much time for random change or deterministic change through natural selection,” said geneticist Joshua Akey of the University of Washington, co-author of the Nov. 28 Nature study. “We have a repository of all this new variation for humanity to use as a substrate. In a way, we’re more evolvable now than at any time in our history.”
Full article

There are so many interesting things to do with this information, so many interesting places you could go with it, so many projects and conversations that could be had, that I’m just going to leave this here for you all to have at it.

neurosciencestuff:

Human Evolution Enters an Exciting New Phase

“Most of the mutations that we found arose in the last 200 generations or so. There hasn’t been much time for random change or deterministic change through natural selection,” said geneticist Joshua Akey of the University of Washington, co-author of the Nov. 28 Nature study. “We have a repository of all this new variation for humanity to use as a substrate. In a way, we’re more evolvable now than at any time in our history.”

Full article

There are so many interesting things to do with this information, so many interesting places you could go with it, so many projects and conversations that could be had, that I’m just going to leave this here for you all to have at it.

Filed under science

214 notes


Forget All-Night Studying, a Good Night’s Sleep Is Key to Doing Well on Exams
As fall semesters wind down at the country’s colleges and universities, students will be pulling all-night study sessions to prepare for final exams. Ironically, the loss of sleep during these all-nighters could actually work against them performing well, says a Harris Health System sleep specialist.
Dr. Philip Alapat, medical director, Harris Health Sleep Disorders Center, and assistant professor, Baylor College of Medicine, recommends students instead study throughout the semester, set up study sessions in the evening (the optimal time of alertness and concentration) and get at least 8 hours of sleep the night before exams.
“Memory recall and ability to maintain concentration are much improved when an individual is rested,” he says. “By preparing early and being able to better recall what you have studied, your ability to perform well on exams is increased.”
Alapat’s recommendations:• Get 8-9 hours of sleep nightly (especially before final exams)
• Try to study during periods of optimal brain function (usually around 6-8 p.m.)
• Avoid studying in early afternoons, usually the time of least alertness
• Don’t overuse caffeinated drinks (caffeine remains in one’s system for 6-8 hours)
• Recognize that chronic sleep deprivation may contribute to development of long-term diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease
If suffering from bouts of chronic sleep deprivation or nightly insomnia that lasts for more than a few weeks, Alapat suggests consulting a sleep specialist.

Forget All-Night Studying, a Good Night’s Sleep Is Key to Doing Well on Exams

As fall semesters wind down at the country’s colleges and universities, students will be pulling all-night study sessions to prepare for final exams. Ironically, the loss of sleep during these all-nighters could actually work against them performing well, says a Harris Health System sleep specialist.

Dr. Philip Alapat, medical director, Harris Health Sleep Disorders Center, and assistant professor, Baylor College of Medicine, recommends students instead study throughout the semester, set up study sessions in the evening (the optimal time of alertness and concentration) and get at least 8 hours of sleep the night before exams.

“Memory recall and ability to maintain concentration are much improved when an individual is rested,” he says. “By preparing early and being able to better recall what you have studied, your ability to perform well on exams is increased.”

Alapat’s recommendations:
• Get 8-9 hours of sleep nightly (especially before final exams)

• Try to study during periods of optimal brain function (usually around 6-8 p.m.)

• Avoid studying in early afternoons, usually the time of least alertness

• Don’t overuse caffeinated drinks (caffeine remains in one’s system for 6-8 hours)

• Recognize that chronic sleep deprivation may contribute to development of long-term diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease

If suffering from bouts of chronic sleep deprivation or nightly insomnia that lasts for more than a few weeks, Alapat suggests consulting a sleep specialist.

(via neurosciencestuff)

Filed under science education studying study habits sleep

3,758 notes

jekoh:

willverbosityandtime:

purplemuskrat:

thebearyscarypandaspensieve:

explore-blog:

Roominate – a new line of dollhouses for girls aims to spark interest in science, technology, and STEM rather than reinforcing the gender stereotypes of traditional toys. The startup comes from three female engineers

( Springwise)

Totally getting this for my niece in a few years.

Hmm, sister’s probably too old, what other little girls do I know?

…I would play with this and I’m turning 25 in just under a week.

(Source: explore-blog)

Filed under science stem

163 notes

education,

jtotheizzoe:

Wollstonecraft

A Kickstarter project to create a pro-math, pro-science, pro-literature adventure novel that is for and about girls. It chronicles the detective agency of 11 year-old Ada (the world’s first computer programmer) and her friend Mary (the world’s first sci-fi author). They use their brains and their education to solve problems, just like real women do.

As the creator says, “If Jane Austen wrote about zeppelins and brass goggles, this would be the book.”

This is a project we can all get behind. Check it out, and support it!

(via Airship Ambassador — Kickstarter)

They’ve reached their goal — I’m mostly posting because this is a book I wish I could have had when I was a little girl who loved math and science and reading (and occasionally history).  There wasn’t a lot of sci-fi available for me at the time (pre-internet, where those who dictated what went into the libraries told me that science fiction wasn’t real reading).  Instead I devoured biographies of scientists in general and outstanding women particularly, adventure and mystery stories with female protagonists, and occasional fantastic stories that barely had any women at all, but got my mind working. They were all great books, but it would have been lovely to have some literature that left me with big thoughts that were less grounded and more driven by imagination, with characters who looked like me in the driver’s seat.

So yes…this is going to exist, and I am excited.

Filed under education lit reading books children's books history math science